Church Quilters Sew Masks for Simpson University Students

REDDING, Calif.—A quilting and sewing group from Pathway church in Redding has made 200 face masks for Simpson University students as they prepare to return to campus in the fall.

The group, overseen by former professional quilter Becky Cable, makes quilts for North State pregnancy care centers, as well as baby clothes for a Christian & Missionary Alliance hospital in Mali, West Africa. Last year the group sent more than 475 handmade “mama packs”—which include a receiving blanket, bib, beanie, booties, and shirt—to the hospital.

Following the devastating Carr and Camp fires in Shasta and Butte counties in 2018, the group made hundreds of lap quilts for survivors.

Perry-ThomasAnd this spring, when retired physician and fellow church member Dr. Tom Perry (pictured) asked if they would sew face masks for Simpson University, they did not hesitate. Dr. Perry, who is a university board member, donated funds to help with materials. The supplies for all the group’s projects come from donations.

“Of course, absolutely – anything to help Simpson be able to reopen,” Becky said. “I know how much of a life-changer Simpson has been for so many people.”

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Becky Cable

Becky has firsthand knowledge of Simpson’s impact and longtime times to the C&MA, the university’s affiliated denomination. She attended Simpson when the college was located in San Francisco. Her sister and brother-in-law, Ruth and John Henderson, are graduates. John Henderson was an Alliance pastor for many years before he retired. Her sister and brother-in-law Cathy and Blaine Kazebee are Simpson alums, as well as her brother, Jim Voss, whose wife Nancy (Mason) also attended Simpson. Jim was an Alliance pastor before becoming a director of Gatehouse Ministries, an Alliance-affiliated nonprofit in Redding that serves students whose parents are missionaries. Becky’s son Chris Cable, and his wife, Cassie (Turner), graduated from the Redding campus, as did her daughter Karen Sicheneder, daughter-in-law Raina (Forbes) Cable, and a number of other relatives.

Dependent on state and county COVID-19 guidelines, Simpson University is working toward reopening in the fall for in-person instruction.

“Having a large supply of masks and other protective equipment is essential,” President Norman Hall said. “We are so thankful for the time and talents these women have given to support our efforts to ensure the safety of our students, faculty, staff and visitors.”

Becky first made masks for a friend’s daughter who serves as an emergency room nurse in Southern California. She then reached out to her church family to ask who needed or wanted one. She has made masks for a hospital in Red Bluff, where a friend’s son is a physician, and for group homes and a local food bank. When her son posted on Facebook that his mother made masks, she had strangers request them.

She has made nearly 1,000 masks so far. It takes her about 15 to 20 minutes to make one.

“It gives me a purpose during this time,” Becky said. “I live alone, with my cat, and it was devastating to be isolated like this. When I started making masks, people would come to my front porch to pick them up and talk to me through the screen door. It helped my mental state. I believe it was something God provided for me during this difficult time.”

The Pathway quilting and sewing group, comprising about eight members, has been meeting for several years. Becky started a similar group at an Alliance church in Fairfield prior to moving to Redding.

“The purpose of our group is to have women come together in a setting where they can share their lives,” she said. “It’s not just another Bible study. We get to know and love each other and bear each other’s burdens.”

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Pathway church quilting and sewing group participants in 2019. Five group members sewed masks for Simpson University from their homes during the pandemic shutdown. // Photo by Becky Cable

Becky has found her sewing ministry to be one that blesses her as well as the recipients. She’s given more than three dozen masks to postal workers, including leaving some in her mailbox for her carrier.

“He honked his horn and waved,” she said. “You don’t know what it will mean. You receive the greater blessing when you can bless others.”

The Pathway group sewed the Simpson masks at home, using kits that Becky assembled. Other mask-makers included Arlene Johnson, Lois Nichols, Judy Hatton, and Kathy Ulrich. They are now working on masks for five area schools that Pathway church connects with in their after-school programs.

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The Pathway church quilting and sewing group made red and gray masks for Simpson University.

 

“Our group is about encouraging others and lifting them up to come closer to God,” Becky said. “It’s that kind of thing I’m passionate about.”

She cites Colossians 3:23 and Hebrews 10:24 as two verses that have guided her: “Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord,” and “Let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love and good deeds.”

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Becky Cable leads a quilting and sewing group at Pathway church that provided 200 face masks for Simpson University.

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Simpson University, a Christian university founded in 1921, moved to Redding 30 years ago and will celebrate its centennial in 2021. In addition to offering 25 majors in its traditional undergraduate program, the university has graduated more than 4,000 North State adults from its ASPIRE degree-completion program, and nearly 3,000 from its School of Education. It has a No. 7-ranked School of Nursing, a seminary, and master’s programs in counseling psychology and organizational leadership. Simpson University is listed in U.S. News and World Report’s Top 100 Regional Universities West and recognized nationally by Colleges of Distinction. The university is launching new programs in digital media, computer information systems, and engineering, and recently added athletics programs in track and field, swimming and diving, women’s wrestling, and men’s volleyball, as well as a bass fishing team. The university is also working to better serve transfer students from community colleges through its commitment to Associate Degree for Transfer agreements. Learn more about Simpson University at simpsonu.edu. Follow university news at simpsonunews.com.

 

 

Simpson University Students Celebrate 2019 WorldSERVE Teams

With a long history of preparing students for missionary service, Simpson University relaunched a student-led missions program 25 years ago. The program continues today as WorldSERVE, which describes itself as taking students on a yearlong discipleship journey that includes a short-term service trip.

 By Hayley Wylie

REDDING, Calif.–Simpson University WorldSERVE students hosted their annual Celebration Night recently to share the adventures of their student-led mission trips during spring and summer breaks.

Nearly 30 students participated on trips to Thailand, Taiwan, India, the Philippines, and Chicago. Students served in a variety of ways, including working in youth centers, mentoring young people, helping with medical missions, and more.

On Sept. 19, they gathered in LaBaume-Rudat Hall to worship, share, and listen. A student from each team shared a testimony from their trip.

The first to speak was Autumn McCuller, a nursing student who went with other nursing majors to India. The trip involved medical missions work. Students were able to work at clinics and provide service to many people, as well as share the gospel.

One day out of the six-week-long trip, they served at a small community three hours from where they were staying.

“There were 300 people in six hours in a church no bigger than a garden shed,” McCuller said. “God is in India.”

The next to speak was Sarah Stoddard from Team Philippines. Stoddard shared that missions had been placed on her heart, but she was unsure what to expect from the trip.

“I had no idea what I was getting myself into,” she said.

Their trip dealt with relationship ministry, and the team worked hard to connect with other college students in Manila. “We loved on them. We taught them who Jesus is through our actions, through our love,” Stoddard said.

She also revealed that she still keeps in contact with the people she met in the Philippines.

“I still talk to them. This is a lifelong relationship that I now have,” Stoddard said.

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Next was Caleigh Roberts representing Team Thailand, whose focus was coffee shop ministry. They would often go to the same coffee shop and build relationships with people.

Roberts mentioned doing a prayer walk through a red-light district on one night of their trip. “It was so strange to feel Jesus in a place that I thought Jesus would never be,” she said.

Although going to Thailand wasn’t her original plan, she shared that she was happy she went. “God had a different plan. His plan is always better,” Roberts said.

Roberts encouraged other students to go in the future. “I know this makes a difference because it’s making a difference in me,” she said.

Annie Christopherson from Team Taiwan shared that she felt called to be a part of WorldSERVE.

“If God calls me to go, I’m gonna go,” Christopherson said. She shared that there were difficulties before going to Taiwan, but she believes, “God always makes a way.”

Overall, she described the experience as a positive one. “I didn’t know I could grow even more in God in just three weeks,” Christopherson said.

The last testimony shared for the night was by Bigane Perez from Team Chicago. The team worked for an afterschool program during spring break last semester. Perez said she was skeptical of the trip at first but ultimately ended up following the calling she felt from God.

“I have to be comfortable with the uncomfortable,” Perez said, sharing that she enjoyed her trip.

At the end of the night, Samantha Ulnik, a WorldSERVE intern, announced that WorldSERVE is planning on going back to Thailand, Taiwan, Chicago, possibly Mexico, and other places to be announced later.

Ulnik also revealed this year’s WorldSERVE theme, from Esther 4:14: “Perhaps you have been chosen for a time like this.” She encouraged Simpson University students to consider participating in WorldSERVE this year. “God is inviting you to something big,” she said.

Learn more about the WorldSERVE student missions program at simpsonu.edu/worldserve.

About the author: Hayley Wylie is an English major in her senior year at Simpson University. She is from Vacaville, Calif., and is editor-in-chief of The Slate, the university’s student newspaper.

Photos by Chyna Xiong

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Simpson University, founded in 1921, moved to Redding 30 years ago and will celebrate its centennial in 2021. In addition to offering 25 majors in its traditional undergraduate program, the university has graduated more than 4,000 North State adults from its ASPIRE degree-completion program, and nearly 3,000 from its School of Education. It has a No. 8-ranked School of Nursing, a seminary, and master’s programs in counseling psychology and organizational leadership. Simpson University is recognized nationally by Colleges of Distinction.

Simpson is launching new athletics programs in track and field, swimming and diving, women’s wrestling, and men’s volleyball, as well as a bass fishing team. The university is also working to better serve transfer students from community colleges through its commitment to Associate Degree for Transfer agreements, and it is offering new scholarships.

Learn more about Simpson University at simpsonu.edu. Follow university news at simpsonunews.com.

 

 

 

Simpson University Offers Legacy Alliance Scholarship for C&MA Students

REDDING, Calif.—Focusing on the church families within its denominational tradition, Simpson University is offering a Legacy Alliance Scholarship up to $18,000 to help Christian & Missionary Alliance (C&MA) young people afford a private four-year Christian education.

The scholarship is available to eligible C&MA students who have an endorsement letter from their C&MA pastor or youth pastor.

The Legacy Alliance Scholarship will be an award of up to $60,000 over four years (up to $15,000 per year). A student can receive an additional amount up to $12,000 ($3,000 per year) with the Simpson University Matching Award when a family member, business or church sponsor commits to providing yearly funds toward the student’s education at Simpson. With a sponsor commitment, the total scholarship could be up to $21,000 a year.

“If a student qualified for Cal and/or Pell grant funding and is eligible for the Legacy Alliance Scholarship, she or he could attend Simpson University for about $5,000 a year,” President Norman Hall said. “This is a tremendous opportunity for young people in the C&MA to obtain a Christian higher education at an institution committed to Christ-centered learning, community, and service.”

The scholarship is a natural way for the university to partner with churches within its denominational tradition, he said.

“Simpson University has been one of the Alliance’s colleges for nearly 100 years and deeply values its heritage,” Dr. Hall said. “Our longstanding motto of ‘Gateway to World Service’ continues to be lived out each year by students and alumni who serve in missions, businesses, classrooms, churches, hospitals, and boardrooms throughout the world.”

The Legacy Alliance Scholarship pays a majority of a student’s tuition, allowing the student to maximize their federal and/or state student aid to pay for the remaining portion of tuition and residential housing.

Recipients of the scholarship must commit to living on campus to experience the benefits of Simpson University community life, unless approved to live off campus.

For more information, contact Molly Huffman at mhuffman@simpsonu.edu.

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Simpson University, founded in 1921, moved to Redding almost 30 years ago and will celebrate its centennial in 2021. In addition to offering 25 majors in its traditional undergraduate program, the university has graduated almost 4,000 North State adults from its ASPIRE degree-completion program, and nearly 3,000 from its School of Education. It has a highly ranked School of Nursing, a seminary, and master’s programs in counseling psychology and organizational leadership.

Simpson is launching new athletics programs in track and field, swimming and diving, women’s wrestling, and men’s volleyball, as well as a bass fishing team. The university is also working to better serve transfer students from community colleges through its commitment to Associate Degree for Transfer agreements, and it is offering new scholarships.

Learn more about Simpson University at simpsonu.edu. Follow university news at simpsonunews.com.

Simpson University Partners with Crown College to Teach ‘Virtual’ Class

REDDING, Calif.—In a new joint venture between colleges of The Christian and Missionary Alliance, Simpson University is sharing a sociology class in “real time” with Crown College in Minnesota.

Dr. Craig Cook, who serves as dean of Simpson University’s School of Education, taught at Crown College from 2004 to 2012 and has a degree in sociology. He is teaching the general education course in a face-to-face format at Simpson while interactively “livestreaming” it to a classroom at Crown.

“Combining resources in this way is economical, but it’s also exciting to collaborate,” Dr. Cook said. “One goal is to heighten the interaction between our two colleges and our students, who share a common denominational heritage.”

Simpson University and Crown College are two of the four U.S. colleges affiliated with The C&MA denomination. The others are Toccoa Falls College (Georgia) and Nyack College (New York).

In his Simpson classroom, Dr. Cook uses a 360-degree “Owl” camera that follows a speaker around the room. His students see a screen showing the classroom at Crown. The Crown students have two screens: one showing PowerPoint slides related to course content and one showing the Simpson classroom.

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Simpson University’s Dr. Craig Cook talks to Crown College Provost Scott Moats after the second joint class session. The “Owl” camera, front center, follows voice sounds.

The technology allows for live questions and answers. “I told the students this class is going to have a different rhythm,” Dr. Cook said. “It may feel awkward at first, but let’s hang with it. The goal is learning and getting the information to you in an effective way.”

Dr. Scott Moats, provost at Crown College, first broached the collaborative idea with C&MA colleges and hopes to eventually write a paper about this new learning partnership between institutions.

“This is our second semester at Crown of working with this technology, and we learn more each class and each semester,” Dr. Moats said. “The Crown/Simpson collaboration is one of, I hope, many steps where we can begin to think about ways to collaborate and strengthen our institutions. I am excited to work with Dr. Cook on this project and have the highest regard for his knowledge of sociology and his understanding of pedagogy. He is the perfect partner for an experiment of this nature.”

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Simpson University, established in 1921, is a Christian university offering undergraduategraduate, and teaching credential programs. The university will celebrate its centennial in 2021. Simpson was named as one of the 2018 Colleges of Distinction. Academic programs include ASPIRE, a degree-completion program geared toward working adults with both on-campus and online course offerings; the Betty M. Dean School of NursingA.W. Tozer Seminary, the School of Education, and the School of Graduate Professional Studies. For information about the university, or to arrange a campus visit, call 1-888-9-SIMPSON or visit simpsonu.edu.

C&MA President Stumbo Speaks to Simpson University Students

REDDING, Calif.—The president of The Christian and Missionary Alliance (C&MA) spoke to Simpson University students and others Oct. 3, sharing his remarkable story of illness, faith and healing.

Dr. John Stumbo recounted his journey, which began 10 years ago this month, to students during their twice-weekly “Gather” service in the James M. Grant Student Life Center. In 2013, Dr. Stumbo was elected 12th president of the U.S. C&MA. Simpson University is one of four U.S. colleges affiliated with the C&MA.

“This man loves the Lord,” Simpson President Norm Hall said during his introduction of Dr. Stumbo. “He’s got a tender heart, and he’s a really good listener. He has been on an epic journey with our Father.”

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Simpson University President Norm Hall, right, presents C&MA President John Stumbo with some Simpson apparel.

In 2008, Dr. Stumbo, an active sportsman and pastor, was suddenly weakened by a mysterious illness that robbed him of muscle strength and the ability to swallow. His wife Joanna became his caregiver during a two-year period of recovery. His ability to swallow was miraculously healed, and he returned to ministry.

Referencing Psalms 74 and 139, Dr. Stumbo emphasized that God is God of day and night, both darkness and light. “My God is the God of the best of times and the worst of times,” he said, describing the ordeal he and his wife endured, including 77 days in the hospital, no clear medical diagnosis, and not being able to eat or drink for 1.5 years.

“At first, I had the attitude I was going to beat this thing,” he said. “As the months wore on … it started to feel like sandpaper to my soul.” Going to church was difficult, he admitted.

“When you need people the most, you’re going to be tempted to be with them the least,” he said. “Staying in community is a difficult thing when everything within you is saying isolate.”

But he and Joanna learned the importance of staying connected. “Our faith was down to a little thread some days—hardly anything to hang on to,” he said. “But somebody around you is still believing for you; their faith is like a rope. And it’s legal to hang on to somebody else’s faith for a while.

“And guess what happens? When you stay in community, eventually your faith is going to be strong again, and they may need to hold on to your faith for a while,” he said.

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About a year into his struggle, Dr. Stumbo said he started to gain a bigger perspective of what God was doing in his life, citing the image of a potter restarting a clay pot while it spun on the wheel.

“God, if your hands are still on my life, if you’re doing a do-over, I’m in,” he finally said.

Psalm 23 talks about God setting a table for the psalmist in the presence of his enemies—enemies that could include illness or other hardships, Dr. Stumbo said.

“Pull up a chair and take a seat,” he said. “There are some life lessons that can only be experienced in the meantime. If God were quick to answer all our prayers, we would be really shallow people.”

On a trip from Salem to St. Louis with Joanna, Dr. Stumbo began to experience healing and was able to eat and drink again. “He healed me instantly and powerfully but not completely,” he said, noting he still has some muscle issues from the illness.

“Where is God in your story?” he asked Simpson students. “The answer is this: Always active, sometimes mysterious … Trust that God is always at work within you.”

Simpson senior Nathan Bruce, a communication major, said the message was powerful. “God can be silent, but that doesn’t mean he’s not present. He’s able to do all things when he wants to.”

Having the C&MA president visit campus was notable, Bruce said. “For him to come to Simpson was a cool experience,” he said.

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John Stumbo produces a monthly video blog which is available on the C&MA website and has written three books: God in You: A ConversationIn The Midst: Treasures from the Dark, and An Honest Look at a Mysterious Journey.

Simpson University, established in 1921, is a Christian university offering undergraduategraduate, and teaching credential programs. The university will celebrate its 30th year in Redding in 2019. Simpson was named as one of the 2018 Colleges of Distinction. Academic programs include ASPIRE, a degree-completion program geared toward working adults with both on-campus and online course offerings; the Betty M. Dean School of NursingA.W. Tozer Seminary, the School of Education, and the School of Graduate Professional Studies. For information about the university, or to arrange a campus visit, call 1-888-9-SIMPSON or visit simpsonu.edu.