Simpson University Announces Start of Engineering, Technology, Digital Media

REDDING, Calif.—Simpson University is pleased to announce the awarding of $1 million in grants toward the launch of new programs in engineering, digital media, and technology.

The Hugh & Hazel Darling Foundation and The Fletcher Jones Foundation, both of which have supported Simpson University programs in the past, have agreed to provide up to $500,000 each over the next three years toward facilities, lab equipment, faculty and marketing of the new programs, which includes engineering, computer information systems (CIS), and digital media.

“We have identified a tremendous demand for these educational programs, and are responding to both a local and global need for a technically qualified and morally centered workforce,” Simpson University President Norman Hall said. “We are immensely grateful to the forward-thinking Hugh & Hazel Darling and Fletcher Jones foundations for their support and commitment to our higher education goals.”

The grant funds will help establish the first private university technology and engineering program in upstate California, as well as increase access to high-demand technology and engineering majors for students in the region, especially those who are first-generation or economically disadvantaged.

A 2017 study by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics expects the country’s largest job growth to be in the computer and engineering fields by 2024. Yet the North State lacks a skilled workforce in these fields, which has impeded the growth of local businesses and impacted the overall economy, notes Scott Putnam, founder and CEO of Apex Technology Management, Redding’s largest technology service provider.

“Our region is full of smart and creative people, and numerous technology-related businesses have been launched locally, but the lack of a developed workforce has caused many to leave the area or limit their growth,” he said. “I firmly believe that adding additional programs, particularly the development of an engineering program, at Simpson University would be a game-changer for our region.”

Last fall the university retained Dr. Hyung Choi, an internationally known quantum physicist who helped launch a technology and engineering program at Greenville University in Illinois, to help lay the groundwork for an engineering program. This spring, the university is consulting with Dr. Larry Wear in continued development of the program.

Dr. Wear has served at Chico State University as the chair of the electrical and computer engineering program. He is a graduate of the University of Washington, with degrees in electrical engineering, and Santa Clara University, where he earned his Ph.D. in electrical engineering. He helped launch a computer engineering and systems program at the University of Washington at Tacoma, and has considerable corporate and consulting experience, including Hewlett-Packard, Cisco Systems, Tandem Computers (including Compaq Computers), and Lockheed Missiles & Space Operations.

“For the first time we are offering the opportunity to come to Simpson University and learn engineering in a Christian environment,” said Dr. Brian Hooker, chair of the Sciences and Mathematics Department. “We are very excited about this program.”

shutterstock_514412104The program, which is undergoing accreditation review, will offer curriculum rich in electrical, computer, systems, mechanical, mechatronic, civil, and general engineering components.

“Simpson University’s engineering program will be undergirded with emphases in chemistry, mathematics, mechanics and physics,” Dr. Hooker said. “Students will have internships with regional businesses to get real-world, hands-on engineering experience while also being able to live on campus in a Christian community.”

photo-of-a-man-holding-video-camera-2608519Simpson University’s new digital media program, offered this fall as an emphasis in the communication major, will offer students the chance to gain skills in graphic design, photography, videography, animation, and more. Students also will have opportunities to participate in a wide variety of internship programs to further develop those skills in a real-world environment.

The new computer information systems program, administered by the Business Department, will provide professional competencies in managing information, computers, databases, systems analysis, and business principles related to computer information systems. Training in CIS can lead to careers as a database administrator, IT project manager, network administrator, information systems manager, and systems analyst, among others.

A technology and engineering working and advisory group, composed of regional industry leaders, has also been formed to provide guidance on curriculum design that will meet workforce demand, recruitment, and job placement.

Simpson University is one of the most affordable private universities on the West Coast, offering excellent academics, experiential learning, and world-class co-curricular opportunities in a Christ-infused community in beautiful Northern California. The university offers vigorous scholarships for students in a wide variety of areas.

###

Simpson University, a Christian university founded in 1921, moved to Redding 30 years ago and will celebrate its centennial in 2021. In addition to offering 25 majors in its traditional undergraduate program, the university has graduated more than 4,000 North State adults from its ASPIRE degree-completion program, and nearly 3,000 from its School of Education. It has a No. 7-ranked School of Nursing, a seminary, and master’s programs in counseling psychology and organizational leadership. Simpson University is listed in U.S. News and World Report’s Top 100 Regional Universities West and recognized nationally by Colleges of Distinction. The university is launching new programs in digital media, computer information systems, and engineering, and recently added athletics programs in track and field, swimming and diving, women’s wrestling, and men’s volleyball, as well as a bass fishing team. The university is also working to better serve transfer students from community colleges through its commitment to Associate Degree for Transfer agreements. Learn more about Simpson University at simpsonu.edu. Follow university news at simpsonunews.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Simpson University Student Research Symposium Celebrates 10 Years of Scholarship

 By Hayley Wylie

REDDING, Calif. – The 10th annual Simpson University Student Research Symposium was held on Wednesday, March 11.

The symposium featured over 60 student participants, 40 different presentations, and one “live” painting done on-site throughout the day by Southern California artist Hyatt Moore.

Moore gave the symposium’s plenary address, titled ‘A Wonder,’ based on the symposium’s theme. He spoke on wonder in Einstein, wonder in the macro/micro, wonder in biblical literature, wonder in human beings, and wonder — how we get it and how we kill it.

During his message, Moore mentioned that the live painting he would be doing throughout the day – a portrait of Jesus from his painting titled “The Last Supper” — would include Simpson students’ fingerprints. “A fingerprint is an indicator that everyone is unique,” Moore shared.

He ended his message by encouraging listeners: “Let’s pay attention to the wonder around us.”

After his address, many students dispersed to the first session of the symposium — student presentations.

Amy Bernhard, a junior, read one of her short stories at the “Creating Wonder in the Literary Arts” section.

“It was such an amazing experience,” she said afterward. “I loved the interaction and discussion that the room held regarding our lives as stories.”

Connor Rowe, also a presenter and a senior at Simpson, gave a presentation on women during the French Revolution during the “Wonder of Gender in Historical Perspective” section.

“It’s a great opportunity to prove what I can do,” Rowe said when asked why he decided to present at the symposium this year.

Presenters weren’t the only ones enjoying themselves. Freshman Makayla Williams looked forward to going to different panels throughout the day.

“I think it’ll be interesting to see all the different perspectives of research that’s been done,” she said.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Those attending the sessions included Redding City Council member Kristen Schreder, who attended a group presentation called “The Dignity Project” that took a comprehensive look at the problem of homelessness in Shasta County and offered a holistic approach to addressing the issue. Schreder commented during the Q&A session that followed each set of presentations.

“The students here asked the best questions I have been confronted with on this issue,” she said. “They were so thoughtful, and the report is incredibly thoughtful and has some really great ideas.”

She suggested the students reach out to any number of local nonprofits that could implement portions of their plan. “I really applaud your effort,” she said.

The day also included an egg-drop competition hosted by professor Michael Austin. Competitors created a contraption that would hold an egg in place – and keep it from breaking — as it was dropped from the third-floor Owen Center balcony.

IMG_2173

With Hyatt Moore’s completed painting on display behind her, Simpson University alumna Lydia McGaffee shares about her research experience at Simpson and while studying abroad at a banquet following the Student Research Symposium,

After a day of presentations, discussions, and posters, an art exhibit and banquet was hosted for student presenters, facility mentors and administration. During this, Moore revealed his final painting, and the winners of the Stanley Clark Student Research awards were announced.

The award for Best Undergraduate Presentation went to Isabel Harris, Rebecca Carmona, Claire Cozby, Tayler Lennier and Jonathan Liu on the topic, “The Dignity Project.”

The award for Best Undergraduate Poster went to Baylee Wiechecki, Jessilyn Ellenson, Brooke Larson and Alexis Thompson, on the topic, “A Historical Western Conceptualization of Sexuality in the 20th Century in View of a Christian Perspective.”

The award for Best Undergraduate Paper went to Connor Rowe on the topic, “The Other Sex in the French Revolution.”

The award for Best Graduate Presentation went to Haley Muri, on the topic “Struggles that LGBTQ Families Face and How the Satir Model May Support.”

The awards for Best Graduate Paper and Best Graduate Poster went to Colleen House, on the topic, “Finding Wonder After Childhood Cancer.”

The banquet featured guest speaker Lydia McGaffee, a 2019 psychology graduate and winner of Best Undergraduate Paper during last year’s symposium. McGaffee is a director at Camp Hope and applying to graduate school in clinical psychology. She shared about the importance of her time at Simpson, particularly her study abroad semester in Oxford, where she discovered her focus of study of interest.

The symposium awards are named after former Simpson University Provost Stanley Clark, an enthusiastic supporter of the research symposium. Following his 2012 retirement, Dr. Clark and his wife, Susan, established The Clark Endowment for Student Research to support student scholarly activity.

The symposium is an annual event that began in 2011 as a faculty initiative to give students an opportunity to share their research outside the classroom. Divided into morning and afternoon sessions, the symposium is modeled after professional academic conferences.

Learn more about the symposium and read descriptions of all the presentations at simpsonu.edu/researchsymposium.

About the author: Hayley Wylie is an English major in her senior year at Simpson University. She is from Vacaville, Calif., and has served as editor-in-chief of The Slate, the university’s student newspaper.

###

Simpson University, founded in 1921, moved to Redding 30 years ago and will celebrate its centennial in 2021. In addition to offering 25 majors in its traditional undergraduate program, the university has graduated more than 4,000 North State adults from its ASPIRE degree-completion program, and nearly 3,000 from its School of Education. It has a No. 8-ranked School of Nursing, a seminary, and master’s programs in counseling psychology and organizational leadership. Simpson University is recognized nationally by Colleges of DistinctionSimpson has new athletics programs in track and field, swimming and diving, women’s wrestling, and men’s volleyball, as well as a bass fishing team. The university is also working to better serve transfer students from community colleges through its commitment to Associate Degree for Transfer agreements, and it is offering new scholarships.

Learn more about Simpson University at simpsonu.edu. Follow university news at simpsonunews.com.

 

Simpson University 10th Annual Student Research Symposium to Feature ‘Live’ Painting

REDDING, Calif.—Celebrating a decade of showcasing student academic excellence, Simpson University invites the community to participate in its 10th annual Student Research Symposium, which will feature a daylong “live” painting by artist Hyatt Moore.

The symposium on Wednesday, March 11, is modeled after professional academic symposiums and will feature more than 40 presentations and posters by more than 60 undergraduate and graduate students on topics from multiple disciplines. Visitors are welcome to sit in on thought-provoking presentations and participate in Q&As throughout the day.

Staging in the James M. Grant Student Life Center, Moore, a Southern California artist, will be creating a large painting as part of the event. Community members are encouraged to stop by throughout the day to observe the work in progress and are invited to participate by putting fingerprints on the canvas.

Free registration for the symposium will be from 8 to 10 a.m. outside the Bean Scene coffee shop on campus. Guests are welcome to purchase lunch in the campus dining hall. From 12 to 1:15 p.m., the Science Department will sponsor an egg-drop contest at the Bean Scene patio.

Moore will headline the opening plenary session at 10:20 a.m. inside the Grant Center, focusing on this year’s symposium theme of “Wonder.” Moore has been a full-time painter since 2004, with works displayed in galleries, organizations, homes and Christian colleges throughout the U.S. Prior to his becoming an artist, Moore served with Wycliffe Bible Translators, including five years as president. His varied background includes jobs as a draftsman for Shelby American (Cobra sports car), a technical illustrator for Lockheed Aircraft, art director for Surfer Magazine, and positions in printing and media direction in Guatemala and Papua New Guinea.

Artist Hyatt Moore talks about his painting of the Last Supper in this video. Moore will be on campus doing a “live” painting throughout the day on March 11.

The symposium’s theme of “Wonder” seeks to recognize the wonder that has sparked human curiosity, creativity, and exploration—fundamental qualities of student research. Indeed, the university exists as a place to satisfy that human capacity for wonder from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, said event organizers.

“The theme this year really embraces the whole idea for student research at a Christian liberal arts university,” said Dr. John Ayabe, chair of the symposium committee. “At Simpson, faculty work really hard to stimulate our students’ natural curiosity and sense of wonder, and for the past ten years, the symposium has become the platform for celebrating the results of that sense of wonder.”

Throughout the day, participants will present their scholarship in 10- to 30-minute presentations in various classrooms. Seating at each session is limited and available on a first-come basis. A poster session with refreshments is scheduled from 3:45 to 5 p.m. in the Grant Center.

A schedule of sessions will be posted online at simpsonu.edu/researchsymposium.

This year’s presentations include titles such as “The Latinx Wondering Woman,” “The Worst Epidemic You Never Heard Of,” “The Wonders of Child Centered Play Therapy,” and “California’s Housing Crisis and What to do About it.”

The symposium will conclude with an awards banquet for presenters in the Collord-Humphries room. The Stanley Clark Student Research Awards—named after former university provost Stanley Clark, a strong supporter of student research—will be presented to students for best research paper, best poster, and best research presentation in undergraduate and graduate categories.

Learn more about the symposium at simpsonu.edu/researchsymposium.

###

Simpson University, founded in 1921, moved to Redding 30 years ago and will celebrate its centennial in 2021. In addition to offering 25 majors in its traditional undergraduate program, the university has graduated more than 4,000 North State adults from its ASPIRE degree-completion program, and nearly 3,000 from its School of Education. It has a No. 8-ranked School of Nursing, a seminary, and master’s programs in counseling psychology and organizational leadership. Simpson University is recognized nationally by Colleges of Distinction. Simpson has new athletics programs in track and field, swimming and diving, women’s wrestling, and men’s volleyball, as well as a bass fishing team. The university is also working to better serve transfer students from community colleges through its commitment to Associate Degree for Transfer agreements, and it is offering new scholarships. Learn more about Simpson University at simpsonu.edu. Follow university news at simpsonunews.com.

 

 

Simpson University to Graduate First Political Science Majors

REDDING, Calif.—Simpson University’s 130 graduates walking the stage Saturday include two women and six men making history as the college’s first political science majors.

Kyle Carpenter, Solomon Dutton, Shane Geer, Chloe Lynch, Noah Marquez, Michelle Mbok, Brandon Moss, and Anthony Spencer will join other graduates from the School of Traditional Undergraduate Studies, School of Adult and Graduate Professional Studies, Betty M. Dean School of Nursing, A.W. Tozer Theological Seminary, and the School of Education at the 10 a.m. ticketed ceremony inside the James M. Grant Student Life Center.

It will be the second commencement ceremony for new Simpson University President Norman Hall, who joined the university in June. The university received full accreditation renewal with no sanctions in March and has announced new athletic and academic programs, as well as new scholarships.

Simpson University’s political science program offers a standard track that prepares students in American government, and law policy—ideal for a pre-law candidate. Students have the option of pursuing an emphasis in criminal justice, international studies, or social justice.

Marquez, a resident of Big Bear City and Simpson wrestler; Moss, a basketball player from Stockton; and Dutton, who is from Mandura, Ethiopia, want to use their degrees to pursue careers in law enforcement. Classes in the major include numerous guest speakers and field trips involving local law enforcement agencies.

“I took classes that specifically targeted my career goal,” said Dutton, who also played soccer for the Red Hawks.

GRAD_PoliSci

Simpson University History & Political Science students visit local law enforcement agencies on field trips. Political science majors pictured in this group include Michelle Mbok, fourth from the left; Anthony Spencer, fourth from the right; and Kyle Carpenter, second from the right.

Lynch, who is from Gardnerville, Nev., and also served as a resident assistant, wants to use her degree in the nonprofit sector. “I would love to work with organizations to provide relief to areas of the world struck by poverty, natural disasters, and injustice, as well as break down religious, ethnic, and racial divides between peoples, both locally and internationally,” she said.

Mbok, who is from Leesburg, Va., plans to take the LSAT this summer and apply to law school. Her desire is to practice civil rights law.

Geer, from Las Vegas, wants to explore the possibilities of writing public policy or getting into criminal law. He had the opportunity to work on a university policy proposal with a professor.

Several political science graduates said the highlight of the program for them was the professors, Drs. Cherry McCabe and Jamie Williams.

“They got to know each student and our individual passions and did their best to incorporate what we love about political science into our learning,” Lynch said.

Moss said the class sizes and availability of professors were helpful. “They were always able to help me with concepts of policy that I was not familiar with,” he said.

Mbok, who spent a semester in Washington, D.C., with the American Studies Program while at Simpson, said the political science major helped equip her for a public life without fearing the unknown.

“I experienced growth in political diversity and my ability to perceive political engagement through my faith,” she said.

Simpson’s political science program seeks to prepare students for professional or graduate-level settings through rigorous educational experiences, as well as learning how to engage faithfully and effectively as a Christian in the contemporary political world. Learn more at simpsonu.edu/political science.

Read more about the April 27 commencement here.

The commencement speaker will be Dr. Kevin Mannoia, who has served as chaplain at Azusa Pacific University since 2005. Prior that that, he was dean of APU’s School of Theology and served as president of the National Association of Evangelicals. He is an ordained minister and the author of numerous books.

Top photo: Among the students visiting the Anderson Police Department in February were political science students Michelle Mbok, far left; Solomon Dutton, far right; Kyle Carpenter, second from right; and Anthony Spencer, third from right. Not pictured: Shane Geer, Chloe Lynch, Noah Marquez and Brandon Moss.

###

Simpson University, founded in 1921, moved to Redding almost 30 years ago and will celebrate its centennial in 2021. In addition to offering 25 majors in its traditional undergraduate program, the university has graduated almost 4,000 North State adults from its ASPIRE degree-completion program, and nearly 3,000 from its School of Education. It has a No. 12-ranked School of Nursing, a seminary, and master’s programs in counseling psychology and organizational leadership.

Simpson is launching new athletics programs in track and field, swimming and diving, women’s wrestling, and men’s volleyball, as well as a bass fishing team. The university is also working to better serve transfer students from community colleges through its commitment to Associate Degree for Transfer agreements, and it is offering new scholarships.

Learn more about Simpson University at simpsonu.edu. Follow university news at simpsonunews.com.

 

Simpson University Offers New Commercial Music Emphasis

REDDING, Calif.—Taking advantage of its proximity to an international worship music conglomerate and a state-of-the-art recording studio, Simpson University is offering a new music major with a commercial music emphasis.

The emphasis is ideal for students who are interested in music industry careers, including recording engineer/producer, tour manager, artist/performer, and songwriter, said Dr. Dan Pinkston, chair of the Music Department and an award-winning composer.

“Because of our location in Redding, California, close to Bethel Music and Soundhouse studio, our professors are going to be drawn from people who are actually working in the music industry,” he said. “This is a very hands-on program.”

 
Courses include Music Business, Contemporary Songwriting, Introduction to the Recording Studio, and much more. Graduating seniors will record an EP of original music, paired with an album release concert.

Simpson’s Music Department also offers programs in composition, performance, worship ministries, and music education. Its faculty are highly trained musicians, conductors and composers who love what they do and love working with students. Learn more at simpsonu.edu/music. Follow the Music Department at facebook.com/simpsonuniversitymusic.

###

Simpson University, founded in 1921, moved to Redding almost 30 years ago and will celebrate its centennial in 2021. In addition to offering 25 majors in its traditional undergraduate program, the university has graduated almost 4,000 North State adults from its ASPIRE degree-completion program, and nearly 3,000 from its School of Education. It has a highly ranked School of Nursing, a seminary, and master’s programs in counseling psychology and organizational leadership.

Simpson is launching new athletics programs in track and field, swimming and diving, women’s wrestling, and men’s volleyball, as well as a bass fishing team. The university is also working to better serve transfer students from community colleges through its commitment to Associate Degree for Transfer agreements.

Learn more about Simpson University at simpsonu.edu. Follow university news at simpsonunews.com.

Simpson University Students Honored at Research Symposium

REDDING, Calif.—More than 350 attendees filled lecture halls to listen to 25 presentations and posters during Simpson University’s 9th annual Student Research Symposium on March 13.

The symposium is an annual event open to the public. It began in 2011 as a faculty initiative to give students an opportunity to share their research outside the classroom. Divided into morning and afternoon sessions, the symposium is modeled after professional academic conferences.

In addition to sharing their research with peers, faculty, and other visitors, the 34 student presenters were also competing for prizes. The Stanley Clark Research Awards were given to five outstanding presenters at a banquet following the symposium.

The award for Best Undergraduate Presentation went to Paul Bigelow, a history major from Redding, on the topic, “Of the End Times: Comparing Shi’i, Sunni, and Christian Eschatology.”

The award for Best Undergraduate Poster went to Taylor Baldwin, a psychology major from San Luis Obispo, on the topic of “The Effects of Small-Group Participation on Men’s Perceived Social Support, Attachment to Others, and Attachment to God-Figures.”

The award for Best Undergraduate Paper went to Lydia McGaffee, a psychology major from Lilongwe, Malawi, for her work entitled, “What is the evidence for PTSD as a Disorder of Memory? How Might a Cognitive Vaccine be Developed?”

The award for Best Graduate Poster went to Amy Chambers, a master of arts in counseling psychology student, on the topic, “Utilizing Somatic Experiencing for the Treatment of Trauma.”

The award for Best Graduate Paper went to Molly Finn, a master of arts in counseling psychology student from Chico, for her work entitled, “Barriers to Mental Health Services in the Latino Population.”

Award recipients receive a plaque and scholarship funds.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The day’s events began with a free breakfast on the “plaza” and egg-drop competition and concluded with an Outdoor Leadership trail-food cook-off outside the Bean Scene.

The symposium opened with a plenary address by Ryan Collins, CEO of Bethel School of Technology, who wove the theme of “Momentum” into a discussion about his journey into the tech field and the opportunities present for Christians to have an impact. He encouraged students to look for ways to create and sustain momentum.

“Whatever you do, you need to do in excellence,” he said. “Our lives have to speak. We have to be excellent in what we do and who we are.”

Symposium committee member and nursing professor Misty Smith also shared opening remarks about the importance and rigor of scholarship.

“Once a project is completed, it must be shared to grow that body of knowledge,” she said. “The symposium offers students an opportunity to learn about work being developed by their peers … Scholarship is alive and well at Simpson University. Today, we pause to learn, grow and be inspired.”

In addition to Smith, symposium committee members include Drs. John Ayabe, Brian Hooker, Reg Watson, and Jennifer Costillo; and Dean of Students Mark Endraske.

The symposium awards are named after former Simpson University Provost Stanley Clark, an enthusiastic supporter of the research symposium. Following his 2012 retirement, Dr. Clark and his wife, Susan, established The Clark Endowment for Student Research to support student scholarly activity.

Learn more about the symposium and read descriptions of all the presentations at simpsonu.edu/researchsymposium.

Photos by Holly Kiker and Chyna Xiong / Top photo: Dr. Patrick Blewett, left, and President Norman Hall (right) stand with Stanley Clark Award winners Paul Bigelow (second from left), Taylor Baldwin, and Amy Chambers. Not pictured: Lydia McGaffee and Molly Finn.

###

Simpson University, founded in 1921, moved to Redding almost 30 years ago and will celebrate its centennial in 2021. In addition to offering 25 majors in its traditional undergraduate program, the university has graduated almost 4,000 North State adults from its ASPIRE degree-completion program, and nearly 3,000 from its School of Education. It has a highly ranked School of Nursing, a seminary, and master’s programs in counseling psychology and organizational leadership.

Simpson is launching new athletics programs in track and field, swimming and diving, women’s wrestling, and men’s volleyball, as well as a bass fishing team. The university is also working to better serve transfer students from community colleges through its commitment to Associate Degree for Transfer agreements.

Learn more about Simpson University at simpsonu.edu. Follow university news at simpsonunews.com.

Simpson University Invites Community to 9th Annual Student Research Symposium

REDDING, Calif.—The public is invited to sit in on thought-provoking presentations and participate in Q&A and poster sessions at Simpson University’s 9th Annual Student Research Symposium on Wednesday, March 13.

The free, daylong event features 25 presentations and posters by undergraduate and graduate students on topics from multiple disciplines.

Free registration will be from 8 to 10 a.m. outside the Bean Scene coffee shop on campus. Chartwells will provide breakfast vouchers for outdoor dining on Simpson Boulevard. Guests are welcome to purchase lunch in the campus dining hall.

From 9 to 10 a.m., the Science Department will sponsor an egg-drop contest at the Bean Scene patio.

Research-Symposium-Group-One

The opening plenary session will be at 10:20 a.m. inside the James M. Grant Student Life Center, featuring Michael K. Clifford, a venture catalyst in the world of higher education.

This year’s symposium theme is “Momentum.”

“We live in a world today that is experiencing rapid change and creating challenges for governments and social institutions,” said Dr. John Ayabe, chair of the symposium committee. “As a theme for this year’s symposium, momentum offers an opportunity for the university to consider the forces of change in our world from a variety of disciplinary perspectives and to engage students in conversations about opportunities and pitfalls of momentum.”

Throughout the day, participants will present their scholarship in 10- to 30-minute presentations in various classrooms. Seating at each session is limited and available on a first-come basis. A poster session with refreshments is scheduled from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. in the Grant Center.

A schedule of sessions will be posted online at simpsonu.edu/researchsymposium.

This year’s presentations include titles such as “Of the End Times: Comparing Shi’i, Sunni and Christian Eschatology,” “The Cycle of Political Polarization in America,” “Sex, Guilt and the Church,” and “Is Home Birth Safe?”

The day will include a roundtable panel discussion of students and staff on “Momentum from Common Reading: Engaging Brené Brown’s ‘Braving the Wilderness’.” The Simpson community has been reading Brown’s book in the third year of On the Same Page, the university’s common reading program.

The symposium will conclude with an awards banquet for presenters in the Collord-Humphries room. The Stanley Clark Student Research Awards—named after former university provost Stanley Clark, a strong supporter of student research—will be presented to students for best research paper, best poster, and best research presentation in undergraduate and graduate categories.

Learn more about the symposium at simpsonu.edu/researchsymposium.

RSSymposium_19Verticalfull

###

Simpson University, founded in 1921, moved to Redding almost 30 years ago and will celebrate its centennial in 2021. In addition to offering 25 majors in its traditional undergraduate program, the university has graduated almost 4,000 North State adults from its ASPIRE degree-completion program, and nearly 3,000 from its School of Education. It has a highly ranked School of Nursing, a seminary, and master’s programs in counseling psychology and organizational leadership.

Simpson is launching new athletics programs in track and field, swimming and diving, and men’s volleyball, as well as a bass fishing team. The university is also working to better serve transfer students from community colleges through its commitment to Associate Degree for Transfer agreements.

Learn more about Simpson University at simpsonu.edu. Follow university news at simpsonunews.com.

 

 

Simpson University Partners with Crown College to Teach ‘Virtual’ Class

REDDING, Calif.—In a new joint venture between colleges of The Christian and Missionary Alliance, Simpson University is sharing a sociology class in “real time” with Crown College in Minnesota.

Dr. Craig Cook, who serves as dean of Simpson University’s School of Education, taught at Crown College from 2004 to 2012 and has a degree in sociology. He is teaching the general education course in a face-to-face format at Simpson while interactively “livestreaming” it to a classroom at Crown.

“Combining resources in this way is economical, but it’s also exciting to collaborate,” Dr. Cook said. “One goal is to heighten the interaction between our two colleges and our students, who share a common denominational heritage.”

Simpson University and Crown College are two of the four U.S. colleges affiliated with The C&MA denomination. The others are Toccoa Falls College (Georgia) and Nyack College (New York).

In his Simpson classroom, Dr. Cook uses a 360-degree “Owl” camera that follows a speaker around the room. His students see a screen showing the classroom at Crown. The Crown students have two screens: one showing PowerPoint slides related to course content and one showing the Simpson classroom.

acad_crown img_0672

Simpson University’s Dr. Craig Cook talks to Crown College Provost Scott Moats after the second joint class session. The “Owl” camera, front center, follows voice sounds.

The technology allows for live questions and answers. “I told the students this class is going to have a different rhythm,” Dr. Cook said. “It may feel awkward at first, but let’s hang with it. The goal is learning and getting the information to you in an effective way.”

Dr. Scott Moats, provost at Crown College, first broached the collaborative idea with C&MA colleges and hopes to eventually write a paper about this new learning partnership between institutions.

“This is our second semester at Crown of working with this technology, and we learn more each class and each semester,” Dr. Moats said. “The Crown/Simpson collaboration is one of, I hope, many steps where we can begin to think about ways to collaborate and strengthen our institutions. I am excited to work with Dr. Cook on this project and have the highest regard for his knowledge of sociology and his understanding of pedagogy. He is the perfect partner for an experiment of this nature.”

###

Simpson University, established in 1921, is a Christian university offering undergraduategraduate, and teaching credential programs. The university will celebrate its centennial in 2021. Simpson was named as one of the 2018 Colleges of Distinction. Academic programs include ASPIRE, a degree-completion program geared toward working adults with both on-campus and online course offerings; the Betty M. Dean School of NursingA.W. Tozer Seminary, the School of Education, and the School of Graduate Professional Studies. For information about the university, or to arrange a campus visit, call 1-888-9-SIMPSON or visit simpsonu.edu.

Simpson University Invites Community to ‘Encounter’ Science and Mathematics

REDDING, Calif.—Simpson University invites the community to “Encounters in Science and Mathematics III,” a series of TED-style talks and interactive lab demonstrations on Thursday, Oct. 25. Admission is free.

Hosted by the Department of Science and Mathematics, the evening starts at 6:30 p.m. in the Humphries-Collord Room in the dining center on campus, 2211 College View Drive in northeast Redding. Refreshments are served at 6.

From 7:30 to 8:30 p.m., laboratories on the first floor of the Science and Nursing Center will be open for demonstrations.

Featured speakers and topics include:

  • “Iron Mountain Mine, the Toxic Ooze in your Back Yard” – Dr. Brian Hooker, associate professor of biology
  • “Exploring the Marine Life on the Humboldt Coast” – Hillary Kraft, senior biology major at Simpson University
  • “Spuds in Space” – Dr. Trenton Smith, associate professor of biology
  • “What does it mean to be an Orphan Gene” – Dr. David Rice, assistant professor of biology

The Department of Science and Mathematics hosted its first Encounters event in October 2017 and another in February. Learn more about Simpson University’s science and math programs at simpsonu.edu/science and simpsonu.edu/math.

Video: Dr. Berkeley Shorthill gives a hydrogen gas demonstration during a lab demonstration at the “Encounters in Science and Mathematics” event at Simpson University on Feb. 8.

###

Simpson University, established in 1921, is a Christian university offering undergraduategraduate, and teaching credential programs. The university will celebrate its centennial in 2021. Simpson was named as one of the 2018 Colleges of Distinction. Academic programs include ASPIRE, a degree-completion program geared toward working adults with both on-campus and online course offerings; the Betty M. Dean School of NursingA.W. Tozer Seminary, the School of Education, and the School of Graduate Professional Studies. For information about the university, or to arrange a campus visit, call 1-888-9-SIMPSON or visit simpsonu.edu. 

Simpson University Hosts Film and Panel Discussion for Constitution Day

REDDING, Calif.—Simpson University’s History and Political Science Department hosted a free screening of the 2017 film “The Post,” followed by a panel discussion, in honor of Constitution Day.

The event, which was open to the public, was held Monday evening, Sept. 17, in LaBaume-Rudat Hall, room 204.

Attendees first watched “The Post,” a movie directed and produced by Steven Spielberg that stars Meryl Streep as Katharine Graham, the first female publisher of a major American newspaper, and Tom Hanks as Ben Bradlee, executive editor of The Washington Post.

HIST_The Post poster

A Q&A discussion on constitutional and journalistic issues raised by the film followed, from 8 to 9 p.m. Panelists included Record Searchlight Editor Silas Lyons; constitutional law attorney Patrick Hensleigh of Carr, Kennedy, Peterson and Frost; and Jacelyn Wedman, editor of The Slate, Simpson University’s student newspaper.

Panelists answered questions from the audience of 30 to 40 related to journalistic ethics and how to be savvy news consumers, among other topics.

Each year, Simpson University’s History and Political Science Department sponsors an event in honor of Constitution Day. Educational institutions that receive federal funding are required to recognize the Constitution during the week of Sept. 17.

Learn more about Simpson University’s History & Political Science Department at simpsonu.edu/history.

Images courtesy Criterion Pictures

###

Simpson University, established in 1921, is a Christian university offering undergraduategraduate, and teaching credential programs. The university celebrated its 25th year in Redding and the completion of a Science and Nursing Center in 2014. Academic programs include ASPIRE, a degree-completion program geared toward working adults with both on-campus and online course offerings; the Betty M. Dean School of NursingA.W. Tozer Seminary, the School of Education, and the School of Graduate Professional Studies. For information about the university, or to arrange a campus visit, call 1-888-9-SIMPSON or visit simpsonu.edu. 

 

 

 

Simpson University Welcomes Students for 2018-19 Year

REDDING, Calif.—New Simpson University President Norm Hall gave his first formal charge to students during an academic convocation ceremony Sept. 5 marking the official start of the school year.

“God has called us to a purpose – to rise up,” he said. “Let’s change the world together.”

Dr. Hall, who began his role as the university’s 15th president on June 1, greeted the audience of more than 500 undergraduates, as well as faculty and staff, with warm enthusiasm.

IMG_0366

“In the quiet places of my heart, God was calling me to Simpson even before I knew about this place,” he said. “If you are here, I’m convinced he was calling you, too.”

He noted that the number of students has increased this fall and that the student body, faculty and staff “are more diverse than ever,” with 21 new international students and three new international faculty.

Convocation is a traditional celebration of the start of an academic year. It capped off a weekend of orientation activities for new students and followed the opening day of classes on Sept. 4. In the second year of a new Simpson tradition, professors formed two lines and applauded new students as they walked through the lines to their seats.


The ceremony included the introduction of five new faculty members, some of whom joined the university in January; a welcome and invocation from Dr. Pat Blewett, interim provost; singing of the university hymn, composed by music professor Dan Pinkston; an address by Dr. Bill Griffin, campus pastor; and a benediction from Dean of Students Mark Endraske.

DrGriffin_smileReferencing Isaiah 43:18-20, Dr. Griffin spoke on “Look! I’m doing a new thing,” describing the sense of God’s presence and movement he has witnessed on campus this summer.

“Simpson University, God is doing a new thing here,” he said. “It’s beautiful, painful, scary, messy, exciting, and exactly what he wants.”

President Hall raised the question of “who are we, and what are we doing here?” as a daily guide and reminder to live purposeful lives. He quoted from I Corinthians 9:24, urging students to “run in such a way as to get the prize.”

“Too many people live by default – they just let them world happen to them,” he said. “What if we lived by design?”

Quoting Ephesians 2:10, Dr. Hall talked to students about becoming all God intends for them.

“Let’s not wait for the world to happen to us,” he said. “We’re called to live purposeful lives … to work hard in our classrooms, labs, on the field of play … in conversation, in quiet times, in fellowship, and on mission trips.

“God is on the move, and he has called us to rise to the challenge.”

Photos and video by Nathan Bruce and Sarah Barrows / Top, President Norm Hall delivers a charge to Simpson University students during academic convocation. (The shoes, which have five toes, were a gift from campus pastor Bill Griffin.) 

###

Simpson University, established in 1921, is a Christian university offering undergraduategraduate, and teaching credential programs. The university celebrated its 25th year in Redding and the completion of a Science and Nursing Center in 2014. Academic programs include ASPIRE, a degree-completion program geared toward working adults with both on-campus and online course offerings; the Betty M. Dean School of NursingA.W. Tozer Seminary, the School of Education, and the School of Graduate Professional Studies. For information about the university, or to arrange a campus visit, call 1-888-9-SIMPSON or visit simpsonu.edu. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Simpson University to Host Film and Panel Discussion for Constitution Day

REDDING, Calif.—Simpson University’s History and Political Science Department will host a free screening of the 2017 film “The Post,” followed by a panel discussion, in honor of Constitution Day.

The event, which is open to the public, will be from 5:30 to 9 p.m. Monday, Sept. 17, in LaBaume-Rudat Hall, room 204, on the campus at 2211 College View Drive in northeast Redding.

From 5:45 to 7:30 p.m., the university will show “The Post,” a movie directed and produced by Steven Spielberg that stars Meryl Streep as Katharine Graham, the first female publisher of a major American newspaper, and Tom Hanks as Ben Bradlee, executive editor of The Washington Post.

HIST_The Post poster

A Q&A discussion on constitutional issues raised by the film will follow, from 8 to 9 p.m. Panelists include Record Searchlight Editor Silas Lyons; constitutional law attorney Patrick Hensleigh of Carr, Kennedy, Peterson and Frost; and an editor of The Slate, Simpson University’s student newspaper.

Each year, Simpson University’s History and Political Science Department sponsors an event in honor of Constitution Day. Educational institutions that receive federal funding are required to recognize the Constitution during the week of Sept. 17.

“As an institution of higher education that receives federal financial aid under Title IV, Simpson University offers educational experiences about the U.S. Constitution annually on September 17th, which is the anniversary of its signing following the summer-long convention held in 1787,” said Dr. John Ayabe, chair of the History and Political Science Department.

Learn more about Simpson University’s History & Political Science Department at simpsonu.edu/history.

Images courtesy Criterion Pictures

###

Simpson University, established in 1921, is a Christian university offering undergraduategraduate, and teaching credential programs. The university celebrated its 25th year in Redding and the completion of a Science and Nursing Center in 2014. Academic programs include ASPIRE, a degree-completion program geared toward working adults with both on-campus and online course offerings; the Betty M. Dean School of NursingA.W. Tozer Seminary, the School of Education, and the School of Graduate Professional Studies. For information about the university, or to arrange a campus visit, call 1-888-9-SIMPSON or visit simpsonu.edu. 

 

 

 

Simpson University Graduate Earns National Internship

REDDING, Calif.—A recent Simpson University graduate and Redding native has been accepted into a prestigious internship program run by The Heritage Foundation.

Austin Avery, who graduated in spring 2018 with a degree in history, heads to Washington, D.C., on Sept. 7 for a three-month paid internship through The Heritage Foundation’s Young Leaders Program.

The Heritage Foundation is a research and education-based think tank that seeks to help influence public policy through research and analysis. The foundation consists of four institutes that deal with a variety of topics. Avery will be working as a policy analyst at The Davis Institute for National Security and Foreign Policy through Dec. 10.

“My job itself will consist of conducting research on policy issues including terrorism, democracy and governance, refugees, and foreign aid and development,” he said.

Following his internship, Avery plans to stay in the D.C. area and start work toward a master’s degree in international relations at Liberty University.

“My main career goal is to work as a counterterrorism analyst with an emphasis on Africa and the Middle East,” he said.

Avery grew up in Redding and was homeschooled through high school. While attending Simpson, he also worked for several organizations in the Redding area. He served as a legislative analyst at Redding Electric Utility, where he assessed how proposed state legislation could impact Shasta County; and as a paid analyst for Shasta County, working to help alleviate the community stress suffered as a result of the Carr Fire.

He also volunteered for an anti-drug narcotics taskforce and has spent the past five years on the board of the nonprofit Youth Violence Prevention Council.

“As a board member I was able to help develop programs aimed at keeping kids out of juvenile hall and served in a mentorship capacity for troubled youth,” he said. “Simpson’s ethos of being a ‘gateway to world service’ helped me reach out in ways that helped me grow as a young Christian.”

Avery credits his Simpson professors with helping him develop the confidence to take on those roles, as well as providing him with a quality education.

“The faculty at Simpson University not only provided me with an education which helped me outperform other candidates during the interview for The Heritage Foundation, but also helped me mature in my faith,” he said. “I have confidence in the path the Lord is leading me in because of the encouragement I have received from Simpson faculty.”

Learn more about Simpson University’s History & Political Science Department at simpsonu.edu/history.

###

Simpson University, established in 1921, is a Christian university offering undergraduategraduate, and teaching credential programs. The university celebrated its 25th year in Redding and the completion of a Science and Nursing Center in 2014. Academic programs include ASPIRE, a degree-completion program geared toward working adults with both on-campus and online course offerings; the Betty M. Dean School of NursingA.W. Tozer Seminary, the School of Education, and the School of Graduate Professional Studies. For information about the university, or to arrange a campus visit, call 1-888-9-SIMPSON or visit simpsonu.edu. 

 

 

 

 

Simpson University Psychology Students Present at Conference

REDDING, Calif.—Two Simpson University psychology students were selected to present original research this spring at the Western Psychological Association’s annual conference in Portland, Ore.

Junior Joseph VanDyke and senior Hannah Wallace presented research titled, “The Exploration of Anti-Fat Bias and Intuitive Eating Behaviors Among Healthcare Professionals” at the April 26-29 conference.

“Hannah and Joseph are brilliant students who designed, conducted, and wrote their original research from soup to nuts,” said Dr. Ashley Brimager, assistant professor of psychology. “They are the kind of students I would be excited to call colleagues in the near future.”

Both VanDyke and Wallace plan to continue their psychology studies in graduate school. Wallace, from Phelan, Calif., graduated from Simpson University in April and hopes to get accepted into a master’s of social work program. She is gaining internship experience at Bridges to Success in Redding, which provides evidence-based mental health support to children who experience behaviors that disrupt their learning abilities.

“The professors at Simpson have been an essential part of helping me figure out my future plans,” Wallace said. “The opportunity to do research at the bachelor’s level has been a great experience that will help me in graduate school and future employment.”

During the conference, Wallace and VanDyke displayed their research on a poster and took turns answering questions and sharing information with interested colleagues.

The pair looked at the relationship between intuitive eating behaviors (eating by “listening” to one’s body and needs) and anti-fat bias (the level of bias against obese and overweight people) among healthcare professionals.

“Our research suggests that there is a high level of discrimination against overweight people in the healthcare field,” Wallace said. “It also calls for an honest inspection of the eating habits of healthcare workers. Even though our subjects claimed to eat more intuitively, they were still found to eat more based on emotional rather than physical cues.”

Simpson University’s small class sizes allow for close interaction between professors and students, and student research is encouraged and highlighted.

More than 400 people attended the university’s 8th annual Student Research Symposium on campus this spring, which featured 27 student presenters sharing on a variety of topics.

Wallace and VanDyke are among five Simpson students whose research was selected this year for conferences at a regional or national level. Three biology students were selected to present research related to Shasta County’s Iron Mountain Mine at the National Council on Undergraduate Research’s annual conference in Oklahoma.

“The connections that I have made through my professors are a priceless asset of my Simpson University education,” Wallace said.

Simpson University offers psychology programs in its School of Traditional Undergraduate Studies and its School of Adult Studies ASPIRE program. It also offers a Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology.

Photo: Simpson University psychology students Joseph VanDyke and Hannah Wallace presented original research at the Western Psychological Association’s annual conference in Portland, Ore., in April 2018.

###

Other student research stories:
04.12.2018 – Biology Students Present Research at National Council
04.27.2017 – History Student Wins First Place at Regional Conference
04.11.2014 – Simpson University Graduating Seniors to Present Research
01.16.2014 – Simpson University Graduate to Present Research at National Council

Simpson University, established in 1921, is a Christian university offering undergraduategraduate, and teaching credential programs. The university celebrated its 25th year in Redding and the completion of a Science and Nursing Center in 2014. Academic programs include ASPIRE, a degree-completion program geared toward working adults with both on-campus and online course offerings, including degrees in psychology and organizational leadership. For information about the university, or to arrange a campus visit, call 1-888-9-SIMPSON or visit simpsonu.edu.