Simpson University Celebrates Graduates at Spring Commencement

REDDING, Calif.—Hundreds of people filled Simpson University’s James M. Grant Student Life Center on April 27 to honor 130 graduates from all programs—a ceremony that concluded with a student-led procession to the campus cross, where President Norman Hall prayed for the graduates.

“You are being released as world-changers, as a result of Simpson University’s commitment and conviction to create in you critical thinking and warm hearts,” he said.

The commencement speaker was Dr. Kevin Mannoia, chaplain at Azusa Pacific University. He has also served as dean of APU’s School of Theology and president of the National Association of Evangelicals. He is an ordained minister and the author of several books.

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Dr. Mannoia spoke from Ephesians 4:1-3 about what it means to lead a life “worthy of the calling you have received.” He encouraged students to both think rightly and live rightly, to allow the Holy Spirit to mold their hearts.

“You be the best at what you are doing,” he said, “but remember that competence is not enough. Competence is important. Godliness is of equal importance.”

The ceremony, which was livestreamed on the web, also featured hymns and special music by the Simpson Chorale, and the presentation of several awards. Dr. Patrick Blewett, interim provost, introduced the professors of the year: Dr. Michelle Stinson (traditional undergraduate studies) and Sarah Herring (adult studies). Mark Endraske, dean of students, recognized student Matt Balane with the Student Life Award for overall excellence.

President Norman Hall presented the President’s Cup to David Duxbury and Sanae Yoshihara for their all-around contribution to the life of Simpson University.

The 2019 spring graduates include students from the School of Traditional Undergraduate Studies, School of Adult and Graduate Professional Studies, Betty M. Dean School of Nursing, the School of Education, and A.W. Tozer Theological Seminary.

The Class of 2019 included Simpson University’s first political science graduates.

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Simpson University’s first political science graduates pose with their professors. From left: Dr. Timothy Orr, Noah Marquez, Solomon Dutton, Kyle Carpenter, Shane Geer, Anthony Spencer, Brandon Moss, Dr. John Ayabe. Kneeling, Dr. Cherry McCabe, Chloe Lynch, and Michelle Mbok.

The week of commencement was filled with activities, including a pinning ceremony for 15 graduates from the Betty M. Dean School of Nursing, ranked as the 12th best nursing program in California; and a baccalaureate service for all graduates the evening before commencement.

Seniors Sarah Sexton, a youth ministry major, and Shane Geer, a political science major, shared brief testimonies at baccalaureate.

Sexton said Simpson University helped fuel her passion for ministry and service. “I have found my voice. I have found who I am,” she said. “I’m eternally grateful for that.”

Geer, who transferred to Simpson as a sophomore, was candid about his failures and mistakes while a student, but said that did not stop the community from embracing and supporting him and encouraging him to become leader.

“It was truly the grace extended to me at this university that allowed me to grow,” he said. “I have come out a better person.”

Geer served two years as a resident assistant and started a men’s ministry group.

“Simpson has fostered a place for me to love deeper than I ever thought possible, think more critically than I ever thought possible, and encounter a God far greater than I ever thought possible,” he said. “I am proud to say I am a Simpson alum.”

Dr. Jennifer Costillo, chair of the undergraduate Psychology Department, was chosen to address the graduates at baccalaureate. She spoke on “Communing with God, Neighbor & Self,” with Matthew 22:37-40 as a guiding text.

Simpson traditionally holds graduation twice a year — in January for summer and fall grads, and in April for spring graduates.

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Photos by Nathan Bruce

 

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Simpson University, founded in 1921, moved to Redding almost 30 years ago and will celebrate its centennial in 2021. In addition to offering 25 majors in its traditional undergraduate program, the university has graduated almost 4,000 North State adults from its ASPIRE degree-completion program, and nearly 3,000 from its School of Education. It has a No. 12-ranked School of Nursing, a seminary, and master’s programs in counseling psychology and organizational leadership.

Simpson is launching new athletics programs in track and field, swimming and diving, women’s wrestling, and men’s volleyball, as well as a bass fishing team. The university is also working to better serve transfer students from community colleges through its commitment to Associate Degree for Transfer agreements, and it is offering new scholarships.

Learn more about Simpson University at simpsonu.edu. Follow university news at simpsonunews.com.

Simpson University Participates in ‘Carry the Load’ Relay for Military

REDDING, Calif.—For the second consecutive year, Simpson University participated in Carry the Load’s National Relay as a launching place for a 4.8-mile walk to honor military, veterans, first responders and their families.

About 15 community members joined the walk, which started at 8 a.m. April 29 on campus and followed Churn Creek Road to the south end of Hilltop Drive, where the next relay leg was scheduled. Participants carried flags, and passersby honked in support.

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Army Chaplain 1st Lt. Chris Peterson, wearing a backpack, addresses relay participants on Simpson’s campus prior to the walk.

Army Chaplain 1st Lt. Chris Peterson, who serves as assistant director of Simpson’s Veterans Success Center, spoke prior to the walk about the high suicide rates among service members that he has encountered as a chaplain.

Carry the Load is a nonprofit founded in 2011 by two veteran Navy SEALS that seeks to provide active, meaningful ways to honor and celebrate sacrifices made by military, veterans, first responders, and their families.

The walk began in Texas, expanded to include an East Coast Relay in 2012, then added a West Coast route from Seattle to Dallas in 2016. This year, Carry the Load added a Midwest route from Minneapolis to Dallas. In 2018, the relay walked through 19 states, with 50 rallies.

IMG_1240At the conclusion of the Redding relay leg, participants had a chance to do 22 pushups in remembrance of the average number of veterans and active service members who die by suicide every day, according to a 2012 Veterans Administration report. Participants received a ring from 22KILL, a nonprofit dedicated to researching, understanding, and promoting awareness of the issues associated with suicide.

Simpson University’s Veterans Success Center, ranked No. 11 in top Christian universities for veterans, opened in 2016. Serving 50 student veterans this year, the center is designed as a central place for veterans and their dependents to access educational and career-planning resources. Equipped with state-of-the-art technology equipment, the center houses a VA work-study site, the Student Veteran Organization, Simpson’s chapter of the SALUTE Veterans National Honor Society, academic resources, conference and study services, as well as a community space.

Simpson University is home to a Veterans Memorial Garden, a gift from the Class of 2018. The garden, which was dedicated in September, is open to the public.

Learn more about Simpson University’s Veterans Success Center at simpsonu.edu/veterans.

Photos by Anna Pownell / Video courtesy Mark Endraske

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Simpson University, founded in 1921, moved to Redding almost 30 years ago and will celebrate its centennial in 2021. In addition to offering 25 majors in its traditional undergraduate program, the university has graduated almost 4,000 North State adults from its ASPIRE degree-completion program, and nearly 3,000 from its School of Education. It has a No. 12-ranked School of Nursing, a seminary, and master’s programs in counseling psychology and organizational leadership.

Simpson is launching new athletics programs in track and field, swimming and diving, women’s wrestling, and men’s volleyball, as well as a bass fishing team. The university is also working to better serve transfer students from community colleges through its commitment to Associate Degree for Transfer agreements, and it is offering new scholarships.

Learn more about Simpson University at simpsonu.edu. Follow university news at simpsonunews.com.

Simpson University to Graduate First Political Science Majors

REDDING, Calif.—Simpson University’s 130 graduates walking the stage Saturday include two women and six men making history as the college’s first political science majors.

Kyle Carpenter, Solomon Dutton, Shane Geer, Chloe Lynch, Noah Marquez, Michelle Mbok, Brandon Moss, and Anthony Spencer will join other graduates from the School of Traditional Undergraduate Studies, School of Adult and Graduate Professional Studies, Betty M. Dean School of Nursing, A.W. Tozer Theological Seminary, and the School of Education at the 10 a.m. ticketed ceremony inside the James M. Grant Student Life Center.

It will be the second commencement ceremony for new Simpson University President Norman Hall, who joined the university in June. The university received full accreditation renewal with no sanctions in March and has announced new athletic and academic programs, as well as new scholarships.

Simpson University’s political science program offers a standard track that prepares students in American government, and law policy—ideal for a pre-law candidate. Students have the option of pursuing an emphasis in criminal justice, international studies, or social justice.

Marquez, a resident of Big Bear City and Simpson wrestler; Moss, a basketball player from Stockton; and Dutton, who is from Mandura, Ethiopia, want to use their degrees to pursue careers in law enforcement. Classes in the major include numerous guest speakers and field trips involving local law enforcement agencies.

“I took classes that specifically targeted my career goal,” said Dutton, who also played soccer for the Red Hawks.

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Simpson University History & Political Science students visit local law enforcement agencies on field trips. Political science majors pictured in this group include Michelle Mbok, fourth from the left; Anthony Spencer, fourth from the right; and Kyle Carpenter, second from the right.

Lynch, who is from Gardnerville, Nev., and also served as a resident assistant, wants to use her degree in the nonprofit sector. “I would love to work with organizations to provide relief to areas of the world struck by poverty, natural disasters, and injustice, as well as break down religious, ethnic, and racial divides between peoples, both locally and internationally,” she said.

Mbok, who is from Leesburg, Va., plans to take the LSAT this summer and apply to law school. Her desire is to practice civil rights law.

Geer, from Las Vegas, wants to explore the possibilities of writing public policy or getting into criminal law. He had the opportunity to work on a university policy proposal with a professor.

Several political science graduates said the highlight of the program for them was the professors, Drs. Cherry McCabe and Jamie Williams.

“They got to know each student and our individual passions and did their best to incorporate what we love about political science into our learning,” Lynch said.

Moss said the class sizes and availability of professors were helpful. “They were always able to help me with concepts of policy that I was not familiar with,” he said.

Mbok, who spent a semester in Washington, D.C., with the American Studies Program while at Simpson, said the political science major helped equip her for a public life without fearing the unknown.

“I experienced growth in political diversity and my ability to perceive political engagement through my faith,” she said.

Simpson’s political science program seeks to prepare students for professional or graduate-level settings through rigorous educational experiences, as well as learning how to engage faithfully and effectively as a Christian in the contemporary political world. Learn more at simpsonu.edu/political science.

Read more about the April 27 commencement here.

The commencement speaker will be Dr. Kevin Mannoia, who has served as chaplain at Azusa Pacific University since 2005. Prior that that, he was dean of APU’s School of Theology and served as president of the National Association of Evangelicals. He is an ordained minister and the author of numerous books.

Top photo: Among the students visiting the Anderson Police Department in February were political science students Michelle Mbok, far left; Solomon Dutton, far right; Kyle Carpenter, second from right; and Anthony Spencer, third from right. Not pictured: Shane Geer, Chloe Lynch, Noah Marquez and Brandon Moss.

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Simpson University, founded in 1921, moved to Redding almost 30 years ago and will celebrate its centennial in 2021. In addition to offering 25 majors in its traditional undergraduate program, the university has graduated almost 4,000 North State adults from its ASPIRE degree-completion program, and nearly 3,000 from its School of Education. It has a No. 12-ranked School of Nursing, a seminary, and master’s programs in counseling psychology and organizational leadership.

Simpson is launching new athletics programs in track and field, swimming and diving, women’s wrestling, and men’s volleyball, as well as a bass fishing team. The university is also working to better serve transfer students from community colleges through its commitment to Associate Degree for Transfer agreements, and it is offering new scholarships.

Learn more about Simpson University at simpsonu.edu. Follow university news at simpsonunews.com.

 

Simpson University Student Spends Robust Study Semester at Oxford

REDDING, Calif.—Simpson University graduating senior Lydia McGaffee experienced the academic opportunity of a lifetime during fall semester, living in Oxford, England, and studying at the oldest university in the English-speaking world.

The Scholars’ Semester in Oxford is one of nine off-campus study programs offered through the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities’ Best Semester program. Students at CCCU schools can spend a semester in Australia, Costa Rica, Los Angeles, the Middle East, Nashville, Northern Ireland, Oxford, Uganda, or Washington, D.C., as part of a faith-integrated study program that emphasizes experiential learning.

Lydia, who graduates this month with a degree in psychology, was one of about 40 students from other CCCU institutions who lived in a residence called The Vines and participated in rigorous individualized tutorials with Oxford professors in their chosen fields of study. She was there from Aug. 26 to Dec. 15.

“It was a great opportunity that prepared me really well for graduate school,” she said. “The setting was amazing – Oxford is a beautiful city that has so much to offer from a cultural perspective. And it is very much the cutting edge of academia.”

In addition to weekly one-on-one meetings with acclaimed Oxford scholars, Lydia and her colleagues attended Oxford lectures of their choosing and traveled the country during a monthlong British Culture Class prior to the start of the semester. Lydia chose a theology focus for that class to supplement her theology minor.

Lydia grew up in Africa, the daughter of missionaries, and moved to the States in 2014. Her older sister attended Simpson University, and Lydia chose the college because it offered similar financial aid options to other Christian colleges but was closest to where her parents lived in Chico. She lived on campus her first three years, serving as a resident assistant her sophomore and junior years.

She majored in psychology, initially wanting to become a child psychologist. That desire shifted over time, and now her focus is to be a trauma counselor.

“I like being able to help mediate with intense relational and emotional healing,” she said. “It’s the direction God has taken me.”

As a missionary kid (MK), Lydia has a longstanding interest in cultures and traveling. “My first year at Simpson I looked into whether they had a study abroad program,” she said. It took most of her junior year to complete the application, get finances in order, and work with the registrar’s office to line up credits and courses with the University of Oxford.

The Scholars’ Semester in Oxford is for students seeking an academically robust program, requiring a minimum 3.7 GPA, as noted on its website. As visiting students, participants have access to Oxford’s 119 libraries, 11 million books and electronic resources, as well as to athletic clubs and artistic organizations.

Lydia met eight times with a professor, who would give her a topic question and send her out to research and write an 8- to 10-page paper each week. A secondary tutorial required an additional four papers.

“It was very, very independent,” she said. “You have to be disciplined to stay on top of the work and have to be able to take feedback well.”

Along with the tutorials, students in the program were required to attend 32 lectures over the two months – no homework, just learning, in class sessions of their choosing.

“It really opens your mind and gets you out of your comfort zone,” Lydia said. “There is a crazy amount of progression in all study areas, and lots of seminars with experts in their fields. It was amazing to be part of it all.”

Due to her interest in trauma counseling, Lydia’s primary tutorial and research focused on psychological disorders, including what puts people at risk and how resilience plays a part.

One of the questions posed by her professor led to a paper that Lydia presented at Simpson’s Student Research Symposium in March. She won the Stanley Clark Research Award for Best Undergraduate Paper for “What is the evidence for PTSD as a Disorder of Memory? How Might a Cognitive Vaccine be Developed?”

“After you wrote a paper, they would discuss it with you at your next meeting,” she said. “Often they’ll go through it and pose questions to see if you really comprehended what you were writing.”

A highlight for Lydia was being able to attend a seminar led by Dr. Emily Holmes, an expert in the PTSD research about which she had been learning.

To round out the semester, students also did a two-week research seminar focused on a 14- to 15-page paper on a topic tailored to their interests. Lydia researched the efficacy of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) in regard to women and children who had been sexually abused.

Having the Oxford experience on her résumé will be helpful as she applies to graduate schools, Lydia said. After graduation, she plans to take a year off before returning to school. Ideally, she’d like to get some experience working with individuals who have dealt with trauma.

“I would love to get an entry-level job in the field,” she said. “I don’t want to go right into more academic study without getting some of the practice side and experience.”

Lydia said she is grateful for the community she fostered while at Simpson University and the opportunities she had. And she would recommend study abroad programs to any student.

“It’s definitely worth it,” she said. “And it’s a good time in life to do it.”

Learn more about Simpson’s study abroad opportunities at simpsonu.edu/studyabroad.

Photos courtesy Lydia McGaffee

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Simpson University, founded in 1921, moved to Redding almost 30 years ago and will celebrate its centennial in 2021. In addition to offering 25 majors in its traditional undergraduate program, the university has graduated almost 4,000 North State adults from its ASPIRE degree-completion program, and nearly 3,000 from its School of Education. It has a highly ranked School of Nursing, a seminary, and master’s programs in counseling psychology and organizational leadership.

Simpson is launching new athletics programs in track and field, swimming and diving, women’s wrestling, and men’s volleyball, as well as a bass fishing team. The university is also working to better serve transfer students from community colleges through its commitment to Associate Degree for Transfer agreements, and it is offering new scholarships.

Learn more about Simpson University at simpsonu.edu. Follow university news at simpsonunews.com.

Simpson University Honors Students During Awards Chapel

REDDING, Calif.—Simpson University honored numerous undergraduates during its final chapel service of the 2018-2019 academic year for achievements in academics, leadership and overall excellence.

President Norman Hall, speaking in his first awards chapel at Simpson University, referenced Romans 12:2, noting especially its inherent invitation to participate in God’s will.

“We go to a Christian college to train up our minds, hearts and spirits to be prepared to participate in what the Lord is unfolding,” he said. “You are qualified to make a meaningful impact in the world for Christ. … Let’s live into our motto, ‘Gateway to World Service’ – let’s go change the world.”

In addition to presenting yellow cords to students graduating with honors (cum laude, magna cum laude, summa cum laude), professors and staff presented the following awards to students:

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Standing, from left: Matt Balane, Paul Bigelow, Michelle Brady, Hillary Kraft, Dr. Timothy Orr, Mariah Moss, Dr. Michelle Stinson, Chloe Lynch, Hannah Goddard, Lydia McGaffee, Bryce Perez, Jordan Allen, Bev Klaiber, Mary Eileen Harter, Jalen DuPree. Kneeling, from left: David Duxbury, Juliana Valencia, Sanae Yoshihara

Stanley Clark Research Awards: Molly Finn, Best Graduate Student Paper; Amy Chambers, Best Graduate Poster; Lydia McGaffee, Best Undergraduate Student Paper; Taylor Baldwin, Best Undergraduate Poster; Paul Bigelow, Best Undergraduate Presentation

Faculty Scholarship Award: Erica Stark

Outstanding Music Student of the Year: Bailey Agness

Outstanding Cross-Cultural Studies Major: Mary Eileen Harter

Business Student of the Year: Daisy Rodriguez

Outstanding English Major: Janet Spoon

Zondervan Biblical Languages Award: Aiden Clark

Psychology Student of the Year: Hannah Goddard

Excellence in Outdoor Leadership: Caleb Fowler

Spanish Student of the Year: Juliana Valencia

Communication Student of the Year: Jalen DuPree

Biology Student of the Year: Hillary Kraft

Phi Alpha Theta Honors: Michelle Brady, Drake MacLaren, Jake Riley

History & Political Science Department Outstanding Research Award: Chloe Lynch

History & Political Science Department Outstanding Student Award: Mariah Moss

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From left, Derick Kuhn, Madison Wright & Aaron Berry

Team Scholar Awards: Men’s and Women’s Cross-Country

Red Hawk Awards: Derick Kuhn and Madison Cox

Male and Female Athletes of the Year: Aaron Berry and Madison Wright

Scholar-Athletes: 94 student-athletes earned a 3.0 or higher GPA

Alumni Association Community Service Award: Bryce Perez

Student Life Award: Matt Balane

Rotary Honor to Youth Award: Jordan Allen

President’s Cup Award: David Duxbury and Sanae Yoshihara

The following faculty and staff were also recognized:

Professor of the Year: Dr. Michelle Stinson
Student Development Professional of the Year: Bev Klaiber
Frances P. Owen Distinguished Scholars: Drs. Stephen Bailey, Brian Hooker, Jack Painter, and Michelle Stinson
ASBSU Appreciation Award: Dr. Timothy Orr

Photos by Chyna Xiong and Connor Sutton

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Simpson University, founded in 1921, moved to Redding almost 30 years ago and will celebrate its centennial in 2021. In addition to offering 25 majors in its traditional undergraduate program, the university has graduated almost 4,000 North State adults from its ASPIRE degree-completion program, and nearly 3,000 from its School of Education. It has a highly ranked School of Nursing, a seminary, and master’s programs in counseling psychology and organizational leadership.

Simpson is launching new athletics programs in track and field, swimming and diving, women’s wrestling, and men’s volleyball, as well as a bass fishing team. The university is also working to better serve transfer students from community colleges through its commitment to Associate Degree for Transfer agreements, and it is offering new scholarships.

Learn more about Simpson University at simpsonu.edu. Follow university news at simpsonunews.com.

Simpson University to Host FCA Coaches Clinic on May 11

REDDING, Calif.—Simpson University will host a free coaching clinic sponsored by the Fellowship of Christian Athletes (FCA) on Saturday, May 11, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

University, school and community youth coaches are encouraged to attend the “3D Coaching Clinic: Transforming the Culture of Sports” and hear from six presenters with more than 150 years of combined coaching experience. They will be sharing their respective approaches to fostering successful programs through transformational coaching strategies that develop the athleticism, character, and faith of their athletes.

Presenters include Dr. Terry Franson, who led the Azusa Pacific University track and field program to 11 NAIA National Championships; West Valley High School football coach Greg Grandell; Rick Prinz, head football coach at Paradise High School; Alison Hall, who has more than 24 years of coaching experience in volleyball and track and field; and Foothill High School wrestling coach Jerry Vallotton, who has coached for 30 years in Shasta County.

The Simpson University Office of Advancement is helping to underwrite the event, which includes lunch and a free 3D Coach book to the first 30 registrants. The registration deadline is May 6.

Register at http://canorthstatefca.org/.

Simpson University’s FCA campus “huddle” (club or chapter) was certified in 2016. Derrick Pringle III, assistant athletic director and head women’s basketball coach, serves as the FCA ministry leader/staff advisor. He and his wife, Nicole, host 12 to 15 students weekly, on average, for fellowship, an inspirational message, and Bible study. Several Simpson FCA student-leaders have been asked to share their testimony and speak at local high school FCA huddle meetings.

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Derrick and Nicole Pringle lead Simpson’s FCA huddle, with weekly meetings and fellowship.

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Simpson University, founded in 1921, moved to Redding almost 30 years ago and will celebrate its centennial in 2021. In addition to offering 25 majors in its traditional undergraduate program, the university has graduated almost 4,000 North State adults from its ASPIRE degree-completion program, and nearly 3,000 from its School of Education. It has a highly ranked School of Nursing, a seminary, and master’s programs in counseling psychology and organizational leadership.

Simpson is launching new athletics programs in track and field, swimming and diving, women’s wrestling, and men’s volleyball, as well as a bass fishing team. The university is also working to better serve transfer students from community colleges through its commitment to Associate Degree for Transfer agreements, and it is offering new scholarships.

Learn more about Simpson University at simpsonu.edu. Follow university news at simpsonunews.com.

 

 

 

Simpson University Offers Legacy Alliance Scholarship for C&MA Students

REDDING, Calif.—Focusing on the church families within its denominational tradition, Simpson University is offering a Legacy Alliance Scholarship up to $18,000 to help Christian & Missionary Alliance (C&MA) young people afford a private four-year Christian education.

The scholarship is available to eligible C&MA students who have an endorsement letter from their C&MA pastor or youth pastor.

The Legacy Alliance Scholarship will be an award of up to $60,000 over four years (up to $15,000 per year). A student can receive an additional amount up to $12,000 ($3,000 per year) with the Simpson University Matching Award when a family member, business or church sponsor commits to providing yearly funds toward the student’s education at Simpson. With a sponsor commitment, the total scholarship could be up to $21,000 a year.

“If a student qualified for Cal and/or Pell grant funding and is eligible for the Legacy Alliance Scholarship, she or he could attend Simpson University for about $5,000 a year,” President Norman Hall said. “This is a tremendous opportunity for young people in the C&MA to obtain a Christian higher education at an institution committed to Christ-centered learning, community, and service.”

The scholarship is a natural way for the university to partner with churches within its denominational tradition, he said.

“Simpson University has been one of the Alliance’s colleges for nearly 100 years and deeply values its heritage,” Dr. Hall said. “Our longstanding motto of ‘Gateway to World Service’ continues to be lived out each year by students and alumni who serve in missions, businesses, classrooms, churches, hospitals, and boardrooms throughout the world.”

The Legacy Alliance Scholarship pays a majority of a student’s tuition, allowing the student to maximize their federal and/or state student aid to pay for the remaining portion of tuition and residential housing.

Recipients of the scholarship must commit to living on campus to experience the benefits of Simpson University community life, unless approved to live off campus.

For more information, contact Molly Huffman at mhuffman@simpsonu.edu.

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Simpson University, founded in 1921, moved to Redding almost 30 years ago and will celebrate its centennial in 2021. In addition to offering 25 majors in its traditional undergraduate program, the university has graduated almost 4,000 North State adults from its ASPIRE degree-completion program, and nearly 3,000 from its School of Education. It has a highly ranked School of Nursing, a seminary, and master’s programs in counseling psychology and organizational leadership.

Simpson is launching new athletics programs in track and field, swimming and diving, women’s wrestling, and men’s volleyball, as well as a bass fishing team. The university is also working to better serve transfer students from community colleges through its commitment to Associate Degree for Transfer agreements, and it is offering new scholarships.

Learn more about Simpson University at simpsonu.edu. Follow university news at simpsonunews.com.

Simpson University WorldSERVE Teams Prepare for Summer Service

REDDING, Calif.—In its 25th year since a relaunch of student-led mission teams, Simpson University is preparing to send four teams overseas for summer service.

The WorldSERVE teams join a completed spring break team that traveled to Chicago to help the Family Empowerment Center work with urban youth in an after-school program. The summer teams will go to India, the Philippines, Taiwan, and Thailand.

About 30 students are participating this year in WorldSERVE, the university’s yearlong discipleship program that includes a short-term service trip.

Simpson University was founded as Simpson Bible Institute in 1921 and has educated thousands of students who have participated in mission trips—many of them going on to full-time missionary work. The university’s longstanding motto is “Gateway to World Service.”

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In 1994, a relaunch of student-led mission teams began, continuing today as WorldSERVE. For the past quarter-century, Simpson has sent more than 1,700 students on trips to nearly 30 percent of the world. Teams partner with mission organizations to help in churches, camps, orphanages, youth programs, and more.

Teams have also helped serve in the wake of national and international disasters, including in Louisiana after Hurricane Katrina in 2006 and in Haiti after Hurricane Matthew hit in 2016.

Below is a synopsis of the summer WorldSERVE trips, which take place in May and early June:

India: Students from the Betty M. Dean School of Nursing will spend time with children from spiritually and physically impoverished families and will travel to a village to work with a pastor’s ministry.

Philippines: This team will partner with a new Christian & Missionary Alliance Envision site in Manila, helping mentor, educate and train at-risk young people.

Taiwan: These students will help serve a ministry coffee shop in downtown Taipei that is working toward starting a church among area youth.

Thailand: This team will seek to build relationships with other university students and partner with long-term workers to teach English, lead a youth retreat, and more.

Students who serve on teams raise their own support, through fundraisers held on campus and in the local community, as well as through generous donations from family and friends. Qualifying students can receive a Summer Ministry Award from Simpson University to apply toward next year’s tuition.

For Simpson graduates who go on to full-time missionary service, a fund created by former board member Rod Samuelson and his wife, Dianna, is available to help with student loan debt that can hinder or delay the start of mission work. Learn more at simpsonu.edu/tributescholarships (scroll down to “Samuelson”).

Learn more about WorldSERVE giving opportunities at http://simpsonu.edu/Pages/About/Support/Giving-Opportunities/Student-Missions.htm.

Photo by Chyna Xiong / Simpson University 2019 WorldSERVE students traveled to Chicago over spring break and will serve in India, the Philippines, Taiwan and Thailand during the summer.

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Simpson University, founded in 1921, moved to Redding almost 30 years ago and will celebrate its centennial in 2021. In addition to offering 25 majors in its traditional undergraduate program, the university has graduated almost 4,000 North State adults from its ASPIRE degree-completion program, and nearly 3,000 from its School of Education. It has a highly ranked School of Nursing, a seminary, and master’s programs in counseling psychology and organizational leadership.

Simpson is launching new athletics programs in track and field, swimming and diving, women’s wrestling, and men’s volleyball, as well as a bass fishing team. The university is also working to better serve transfer students from community colleges through its commitment to Associate Degree for Transfer agreements, and it is offering new scholarships.

Learn more about Simpson University at simpsonu.edu. Follow university news at simpsonunews.com.

Simpson University Prepares to Honor 130 Graduates

REDDING, Calif.— Simpson University will honor more than 130 graduates during its 10 a.m. spring commencement Saturday, April 27, inside the James M. Grant Student Life Center on campus at 2211 College View Drive.

The keynote speaker will be Dr. Kevin Mannoia, who has served as chaplain at Azusa Pacific University since 2005. Prior that that, he was dean of APU’s School of Theology and served as president of the National Association of Evangelicals. He is an ordained minister and the author of numerous books.

The commencement ceremony is scheduled to be live-streamed (check simpsonu.edu for a link). The ticketed event is “sold out.”

It will be the second commencement ceremony for new Simpson University President Norman Hall, who joined the university in June. The university received full accreditation renewal with no sanctions in March and has announced new athletic and academic programs, as well as new scholarships.

The 2019 spring graduates include students from the School of Traditional Undergraduate Studies, School of Adult and Graduate Professional Studies, Betty M. Dean School of Nursing, A.W. Tozer Theological Seminary, and the School of Education.

Simpson traditionally holds graduation twice a year — in January for summer and fall grads, and in April for spring graduates. The April ceremony is typically held outdoors but is being moved inside this year due to unsettled weather predictions and field conditions.

Simpson University was founded in Seattle, Wash., in 1921, and moved to Redding in 1989. In addition to offering 24 four-year bachelor’s degrees in its traditional program, Simpson has also helped almost 4,000 North State residents complete their degrees through the School of Adult Studies (ASPIRE) program, which offers classes online and on campus. The School of Education, which offers master’s degrees and credentialing programs, has graduated nearly 3,000 students, many of whom teach or serve as administrators in Northern California.

The Betty M. Dean School of Nursing, which is nationally accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, is ranked No. 12 in Best RN Programs in California, based on test scores. It has graduated nearly 200 four-year nursing students and more than 175 RN-BSN students.

Simpson is launching a new commercial music emphasis in the fall, as well as athletics programs in track and field, swimming and diving, men’s volleyball, women’s wrestling, and bass fishing. Initiatives are also underway to add a digital media concentration and 3+2 engineering program.

Other programs in the works include social work and kinesiology, as well as exploring delivery of the university’s Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology program in partnership with the Hong Kong Institute of Christian Counselors. The university is also partnering with Bethel School of Technology to offer degrees to students enrolled in the coding “boot camp.”

In January, Simpson announced a Carr & Camp Fire Scholarship for families impacted by either historic blaze. Each recipient who meets minimum qualifications can receive up to $60,000 over four years. The university is also starting similarly “aggressive” scholarships geared toward teachers, students in Northern California counties, Christian and Missionary Alliance students, and more, Dr. Hall said.

Learn more about Simpson University at simpsonu.edu. Follow Simpson news at simpsonunews.com. Follow Red Hawks athletics at simpsonredhawks.com.

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Simpson University Nursing School Ranks No. 12 in California

REDDING, Calif.—Simpson University’s Betty M. Dean School of Nursing has climbed five places to No. 12 in a ranking of the best nursing programs in California by RegisteredNursing.org.

Of the 126 California schools assessed for the Best RN Programs ranking, Simpson’s School of Nursing is the highest ranked private university—and the only one in the top 25.

To determine the rankings, past and present NCLEX-RN “pass rates,” weighted by year, were analyzed. The NCLEX (National Council Licensure Examination) is a standardized exam used by state nursing boards to determine if candidates are prepared for entry-level nursing practice.

The Betty M. Dean School of Nursing, which is nationally accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), has a three-year average of a 97 percent pass rate on the NCLEX. 

In 2018, the School of Nursing was ranked at No. 17 by RegisteredNursing, which congratulated the university and its nursing program on its “stellar performance.”

Named after Dr. Betty Dean, a longtime Simpson University trustee, former nurse and former Butte College president, the School of Nursing has graduated more than 190 four-year bachelor of science in nursing students since the BSN program began in 2011. In addition, more than 175 students have graduated from Simpson’s RN-BSN Track, designed for registered nurses who want to obtain their bachelor’s degree.

In addition to its CCNE accreditation, the Betty M. Dean School of Nursing is also accredited by the Western Senior College and University Commission and approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing. Learn more at simpsonu.edu/nursing.

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Simpson University, founded in 1921, moved to Redding almost 30 years ago and will celebrate its centennial in 2021. In addition to offering 25 majors in its traditional undergraduate program, the university has graduated almost 4,000 North State adults from its ASPIRE degree-completion program, and nearly 3,000 from its School of Education. It has a highly ranked School of Nursing, a seminary, and master’s programs in counseling psychology and organizational leadership.

Simpson is launching new athletics programs in track and field, swimming and diving, women’s wrestling, and men’s volleyball, as well as a bass fishing team. The university is also working to better serve transfer students from community colleges through its commitment to Associate Degree for Transfer agreements, and it is offering new scholarships.

Learn more about Simpson University at simpsonu.edu. Follow university news at simpsonunews.com.

Simpson University Inducts Nursing Students into Honor Society

REDDING, Calif.—Simpson University recently welcomed 11 new inductees into its Honor Society of Nursing.

The class of 2019 honorees include students from the four-year Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program who comprise the top third of their graduating class.

They were recognized during a campus reception in March that included Betty M. Dean School of Nursing administrators, faculty and staff, as well as other guests.

The following nursing students were inducted: Erin Delgado, Sophie Gleason, Sanae Yoshihara, Tabita Simon, Jonathan Quon, Abigayle Hansen, Nicole Choate, Jackie Morway, and Anna Nash. In addition, assistant professors Lisa Scott and Crystal Carithers, were also inducted.

Kristie Stephens, dean of the School of Nursing, gave the welcome and invocation; assistant professor Misty Smith made introductions; and assistant professors Scott and Carithers joined associate professor Linda Henrich in inducting the candidates.

The inductees came forward to receive red honor cords and a certificate.

Mark Schneider, assistant professor, gave the address and charge; associate professor Rebecca Swartzman closed with the benediction.

The Honor Society of Nursing is patterned after Sigma Theta Tau International, founded in 1922 by six nurses at what is now Indiana University School of Nursing. The mission of the honor society is to advance world health and celebrate nursing excellence in scholarship, leadership and service.

For more information about Simpson University’s Betty M. Dean School of Nursing, visit simpsonu.edu/nursing.

Photo by Chyna Xiong / Simpson University Honor Society of Nursing 2019 inductees, from left, Erin Delgado, Sophie Gleason, Sanae Yoshihara, Tabita Simon, Jonathan Quon, Abigayle Hansen, Nicole Choate, Jackie Morway, and Anna Nash. Not pictured: Assistant professors Lisa Scott and Crystal Carithers.

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Simpson University, founded in 1921, moved to Redding almost 30 years ago and will celebrate its centennial in 2021. In addition to offering 25 majors in its traditional undergraduate program, the university has graduated almost 4,000 North State adults from its ASPIRE degree-completion program, and nearly 3,000 from its School of Education. It has a highly ranked School of Nursing, a seminary, and master’s programs in counseling psychology and organizational leadership.

Simpson is launching new athletics programs in track and field, swimming and diving, women’s wrestling, and men’s volleyball, as well as a bass fishing team. The university is also working to better serve transfer students from community colleges through its commitment to Associate Degree for Transfer agreements.

Learn more about Simpson University at simpsonu.edu. Follow university news at simpsonunews.com.

 

 

Simpson University Offers New Commercial Music Emphasis

REDDING, Calif.—Taking advantage of its proximity to an international worship music conglomerate and a state-of-the-art recording studio, Simpson University is offering a new music major with a commercial music emphasis.

The emphasis is ideal for students who are interested in music industry careers, including recording engineer/producer, tour manager, artist/performer, and songwriter, said Dr. Dan Pinkston, chair of the Music Department and an award-winning composer.

“Because of our location in Redding, California, close to Bethel Music and Soundhouse studio, our professors are going to be drawn from people who are actually working in the music industry,” he said. “This is a very hands-on program.”

 
Courses include Music Business, Contemporary Songwriting, Introduction to the Recording Studio, and much more. Graduating seniors will record an EP of original music, paired with an album release concert.

Simpson’s Music Department also offers programs in composition, performance, worship ministries, and music education. Its faculty are highly trained musicians, conductors and composers who love what they do and love working with students. Learn more at simpsonu.edu/music. Follow the Music Department at facebook.com/simpsonuniversitymusic.

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Simpson University, founded in 1921, moved to Redding almost 30 years ago and will celebrate its centennial in 2021. In addition to offering 25 majors in its traditional undergraduate program, the university has graduated almost 4,000 North State adults from its ASPIRE degree-completion program, and nearly 3,000 from its School of Education. It has a highly ranked School of Nursing, a seminary, and master’s programs in counseling psychology and organizational leadership.

Simpson is launching new athletics programs in track and field, swimming and diving, women’s wrestling, and men’s volleyball, as well as a bass fishing team. The university is also working to better serve transfer students from community colleges through its commitment to Associate Degree for Transfer agreements.

Learn more about Simpson University at simpsonu.edu. Follow university news at simpsonunews.com.

Simpson University Baseball Game to Honor Fallen Redding Firefighter

REDDING, Calif.—Simpson University Athletics will host a First Responders Day at an April 13 baseball game in honor of Redding firefighter Jeremy Stoke, who lost his life during the Carr Fire in July.

All fans who purchase a $30 Simpson baseball hat with a memorial Jeremy Stoke patch on it will receive free entry to the doubleheader against Marymount California University. Proceeds will go to Simpson University’s Carr & Camp Fire Scholarship, set up to help college-bound students impacted by the fires. Eligible students can receive up to $18,000 a year toward a Simpson University education.

The Red Hawks play their home baseball games at the historic field in Redding’s South City Park. The first pitch is set for 11 a.m., with the second game at 2 p.m. Stoke’s son, Caleb, will throw out the first pitch.

The Red Hawks are off to their best start in program history and will be fighting for conference standings when they face the Mariners in April right before the Cal-Pac Conference tournament.

Learn more about Simpson University athletics at simpsonredhawks.com.

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Simpson University is a Christian university offering undergraduate, graduate, and teaching credential programs. The university moved to Redding from San Francisco 30 years ago and will celebrate its centennial in 2021. In addition to offering 25 majors in its traditional undergraduate program, the university has graduated almost 4,000 North State adults from its ASPIRE degree-completion program, and nearly 3,000 from its School of Education. It has a highly ranked School of Nursing, a seminary, and master’s programs in counseling psychology and organizational leadership. Simpson is launching new athletics programs in track and field, swimming and diving, men’s volleyball, and women’s wrestling, as well as a bass fishing team. It is working on new programs in digital media/computer information systems, RN-BSN online, and 3:2 engineering. The university is also working to better serve transfer students from community colleges through its commitment to Associate Degree for Transfer agreements, and is offering new scholarships to traditional undergraduate students.