Simpson University Students Explore Marine Life in Humboldt Bay

REDDING, Calif.—Simpson University students studied marine organisms, collected fish and invertebrates from Humboldt Bay, and even helped rescue a young elephant seal during a three-week May Term course in marine biology.

Dr. David Rice, assistant professor of biology, developed the inaugural course, which he taught to biology and non-biology majors in three portions.

BIO_FaillorPart one covered a brief introduction to the science of marine biology, an overview of the chemistry and physics of the marine environment, and an exploration of the diversity and basic biology of marine fungi, algae, and invertebrates. Part two covered the basic biology and diversity of marine fish, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Part three comprised a field trip designed to sample living organisms in key marine habitats, including Humboldt Bay, Trinidad Bay, Patrick’s Point State Park, and more.

“I wanted students to tangibly experience the diversity and beauty of one small corner of God’s created order, the marine biota of coastal Northern California,” Dr. Rice said. “It is amazing to see how these creatures go about living in the places where they are found.”

BIO_MallorySimpson sophomore Mallory Knight, 19, of Concord, Calif., signed up to take the course as a social science major.

“I have always loved marine biology, so when I heard they were offering a lab, which is worth 4 credits, I signed up as soon as possible,” she said. The course met general education lab requirements for the five students who attended.

Simpson University faculty are encouraged to create May Term courses on special topics. Dr. Rice said he hopes to teach this course again next year.

“As a graduate student in biology, I had a particular interest in marine invertebrates and took several graduate-level courses in marine biology,” he said.

The class visited the following locations on their field trip:

BIO_WeddingRockWedding Rock at Patrick’s Point State Park, where they sampled numerous starfish, crabs, chitons, bivalves, and sea anemones.

Trinidad Bay, Trinidad, Calif., where they observed several elephant seals basking in the sun and collected algae, anemones, starfish, and snails. Students also assisted Lynda Stockton, a coordinator for the Northcoast Marine Mammal Center, in rescuing a stranded, young female elephant seal from Old Home Beach. The seal was malnourished and weighed only 85 pounds, Rice said.

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Stone Lagoon, north of Patrick’s Point, where students kayaked for a couple hours and received an interpretive lecture about the ecology and geology of the lagoon from a BIO_kayakinglocal field instructor.

Field’s Landing, near Eureka, Calif., where students received an outdoor lecture presentation on the estuarine mud flats of Humboldt Bay, then hiked through the Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge where they got to witness various species of marine birds.

Humboldt Bay, where students took a three-hour pontoon boat excursion. They collected sediment samples and sifted through to discover various worms, crabs and bivalves. Students helped deploy and retrieve a trawl net from the pontoon boat, netting various species of fish and invertebrates.

The field trip was designed to engage students in applying hands-on methods in marine sampling and identification of marine organisms.

Knight said highlights of the course for her included rescuing the elephant seal pup and kayaking in Stone Lagoon. In addition, she said, “I learned how to tell the difference between seals and sea lions; how to properly eat crabs; that black turban snails are super fast on land; that elephant seals feel like snakes; and that Pacific Rock Crabs are really mean.”

She said she appreciates that Simpson University gives her connections with professors “that I wouldn’t have if I was in classes of 50-plus. The professors are so kind and welcoming,” she said.

At the conclusion of the course, the Humboldt State University Marine Lab offered Simpson University some of their collected specimens, Dr. Rice said.

“They gave us several species of preserved marine invertebrates and fish as well as numerous shells of different marine bivalve species,” he said. The items are archived at Simpson University’s ecology lab.

Learn more about Simpson University’s Science Department at simpsonu.edu/science.

Photo and videos courtesy Dr. David Rice

Top, from left: Simpson University biology professor David Rice, and students Hillary Kraft, Joseph Van Dyke, Laurel McCuller, Victoria Faillor, and Mallory Knight on board a pontoon boat in Humboldt Bay.

Top left: Simpson University student Victoria Faillor holds a chiton from a touch tank at the Humboldt State University Marine Lab.

Top right: Simpson University student Mallory Knight holds a pile perch caught in a trawl net.

Middle left: Simpson University students Victoria Faillor, Laurel McCuller and Mallory Knight collect rocky intertidal marine invertebrates at Wedding Rock at Patrick’s Point State Park.

Centered photo: Closeup of the stranded elephant seal that Simpson University students helped rescue. She had swum roughly 250 miles form her last known location in captivity.

Middle right: Simpson University students kayaking at Stone Lagoon.

Top video: Simpson University students sift through a marine sediment sample for small invertebrates.

Middle video: Simpson University students get to observe and assist in setting a trawl net in Humboldt Bay.

Bottom video: Elephant seals can be seen and heard basking in the early morning sun at Old Home Beach in Trinidad, Calif.

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Simpson University, established in 1921, is a Christian university offering undergraduategraduate, and teaching credential programs. The university celebrated its 25th year in Redding and the completion of a Science and Nursing Center in 2014. Academic programs include ASPIRE, a degree-completion program geared toward working adults with both on-campus and online course offerings; the Betty M. Dean School of NursingA.W. Tozer Seminary, the School of Education, and the School of Graduate Professional Studies. For information about the university, or to arrange a campus visit, call 1-888-9-SIMPSON or visit simpsonu.edu.

Simpson University Business Luncheon to Feature ‘Auntie Anne’s Pretzels’ Founder

REDDING, Calif.—Tickets are on sale for Simpson University’s 17th annual Business Leadership Luncheon on Wednesday, Aug. 22, featuring speaker, author and businesswoman Anne Beiler, founder of Auntie Anne’s Inc., the world’s largest hand-rolled soft-pretzel franchise.

The event, sponsored by Redding Bank of Commerce, will be in the James M. Grant Student Life Center on campus, 2211 College View Drive. Doors open at 11:30 a.m.; the event begins at noon. Platinum-level tickets (preferred seating) cost $35, or $330 for a table of 10; gold-level tickets are $30, or $280 for a table of 10.

Beiler will speak on “The Power of Purpose,” sharing her story of growing up Amish to becoming an internationally successful businesswoman. She’ll talk about how the things she had—a great product, amazing people, and a bigger purpose—helped overcome the three vital business elements she didn’t have.

Beiler began twisting pretzels in 1987 and grew a single farmer’s market stand into Auntie Anne’s Inc. Her professional success came after years of depression brought on by the death of her 19-month-old daughter. Beiler’s story and entrepreneurial insights have been featured on The Oprah Winfrey Show and Good Morning America, among other TV shows. She has been highlighted in numerous publications such as Fortune magazine and Inc. Magazine. In 2005, she sold Auntie Anne’s and authored the business memoir, Twist of Faith.

Register online at simpsonu.edu/businessluncheon. For more information, contact Lisa Neal at lneal@simpsonu.edu or call (530) 226-4764.

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Simpson University, established in 1921, is a Christian university offering undergraduategraduate, and teaching credential programs. The university celebrated its 25th year in Redding and the completion of a Science and Nursing Center in 2014. Academic programs include ASPIRE, a degree-completion program geared toward working adults with both on-campus and online course offerings; the Betty M. Dean School of NursingA.W. Tozer Seminary, the School of Education, and the School of Graduate Professional Studies. For information about the university, or to arrange a campus visit, call 1-888-9-SIMPSON or visit simpsonu.edu.

 

 

Simpson University Outdoor Leadership Students Clear Marine Debris in 7th Annual Service Trip

REDDING, Calif. —Simpson University Outdoor Leadership cleaned up coastal debris and helped clear trails during an annual 14-day backpacking excursion along Northern California’s Lost Coast. It was the seventh year for the Outdoor Leadership service project in this remote area.

44D1613B-6323-46A0-BD13-A2DB821E54D2-14914-000011CB341FC1F9Students partnered with the U.S. Bureau of Land Management for one day of service that included collecting and hauling trash to a location where rangers could pick it up. Another day and a half was spent helping clean up invasive species and clearing trails in Sinkyone Wilderness State Park.

“We do this trip each year for multiple reasons, including to serve and love our neighbor by caring for creation, and to help instill an ethic of care in our students,” said Outdoor Leadership professor Amy Smallwood. “We want them to realize that the amazing experience of hiking this awe-inspiring stretch of coastland is made better by helping to restore its pristine beauty.”

B294A529-E714-42C7-8F25-56A6F858CEE8-14914-000011CB84CDC60F_1This year’s trip was led by Christopher Shughrue, an ’18 graduate, and Keleigh Jusczak, who has one more year in the program. Participants included Sanna Kahlvik, Noelle Sayre, Benjamin Burkwhat, Daniel Painter, Sean Tiner, Sherry Madison, David Duxbury, and Joseph Alexander.

 

The group backpacked the entire length of the Lost Coast Trail, from the Mattole River to Usal Beach, approximately 66 miles. The trail’s remote location makes it challenging for the government agencies that maintain it, Smallwood noted.

“Our group has become instrumental to trail clearing as we are some of the first backpackers to come through each summer, and we help pave the way for other hikers,” Smallwood said. “I’ve had strangers stop me and thank me for the work that we do every year.”

This year’s trip had a special ending. Duxbury proposed to Jusczak when the group reached its final campsite location.

Duxbury had arranged for professor Smallwood and Shughrue’s wife, Jordan, to hike in 7.5 miles with a picnic blanket, engagement ring, nice clothes, and smoothies packed in dry ice, among other items, to meet the group and set up. Co-leaders Shughrue and Jusczak arrived later, having let the group travel on their own that day.

Jusczak first saw her dress hanging from a tree and began to realize what was happening. A note directed her to follow a trail of rose petals and tea lights to the beach, where Duxbury met her and proposed.

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“In my four years of being in the Outdoor Leadership major, the Lost Coast has definitely been the most memorable expedition for me,” Jusczak said. “Students were confronted with many risks and challenges that resulted in a lot of growth as well as connection in community. It was an honor to be a leader on this trip, and watch students grow in many different capacities.”

For more information on Simpson University’s outdoor leadership program, visit simpsonu.edu/outdoorleadership.

Top, Simpson University Outdoor Leadership students pose with the marine debris they picked up along the Lost Coast. From left, standing: Noelle Sayre, Sean Tiner, Joseph Alexander, Benjamin Burkwhat, Sherry Madison, Sanna Kahlvik, David Duxbury, and Keleigh Jusczak. In front, from left: Daniel Painter and Christopher Shughrue.

Middle photos: Daniel Painter, left, and Benjamin Burkwhat, right, help clear trails of invasive species.

Bottom photo by Christopher Shughrue: Daniel Duxbury proposes to Keleigh Jusczak.

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Simpson University, established in 1921, is a Christian university offering undergraduategraduate, and teaching credential programs. The university celebrated its 25th year in Redding and the completion of a Science and Nursing Center in 2014. Academic programs include ASPIRE, a degree-completion program geared toward working adults with both on-campus and online course offerings; the Betty M. Dean School of NursingA.W. Tozer Seminary, the School of Education, and the School of Graduate Professional Studies. For information about the university, or to arrange a campus visit, call 1-888-9-SIMPSON or visit simpsonu.edu.

 

Weed Resident Earns Online Degree through Simpson University

REDDING, Calif.—Working full time with three children who are active in sports, Tina Schoffstoll knew it would be a challenge to earn her college degree.

But when she learned she could complete her bachelor’s online in 16 months through Simpson University’s School of Adult Studies ASPIRE program, she said yes to the opportunity.

GRAD_TinaS“I only live 72 miles from Redding and have friends who attended,” she said. “They always had good things to say about Simpson.”

The 40-year-old Weed resident was one of 150 students who graduated from Simpson University on April 28. She earned a degree in organizational leadership, one of four majors offered through ASPIRE.

“While attending Simpson I felt like I was learning something useful and I was interested in the courses. I know attending Simpson will be beneficial in my current position,” said Schoffstoll, who works at College of the Siskiyous in the Human Resources Department.

A longtime Weed resident, Schoffstoll was working toward becoming a dental hygienist when she became pregnant. She put those plans on hold and began working in a dental office as an office manager. There she realized she had an interest in human resources.

The ASPIRE program offered convenient, manageable courses, as well as helpful staff and professors, she said. “Everyone that I dealt with was wonderful. The professors were approachable and seemed to really care about my success,” she said.

With her husband traveling about 70 percent of the time, and juggling her job and children’s schedules, it took discipline and focus to stay on task. But Schoffstoll found the courses immediately relevant to her career and her life.

“These courses have taught me how to communicate better with people in both my professional and personal life,” she said. “I have more confidence in my abilities as a leader as well.”

Schoffstoll plans to continue working in human resources. “This degree will help me advance in this area,” she said. “The tools I have learned will help me be successful.”

Simpson University’s School of Adult Studies ASPIRE program offers degrees in organizational leadership, psychology, business management, and liberal studies, for those interested in becoming teachers. Coursework can be completed in 12 to 16 months. Learn more at simpsonu.edu/aspire or call Leslie at (530) 226-4198.

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Simpson University, established in 1921, is a Christian university offering undergraduategraduate, and teaching credential programs. The university celebrated its 25th year in Redding and the completion of a Science and Nursing Center in 2014. Academic programs include ASPIRE, a degree-completion program geared toward working adults with both on-campus and online course offerings; the Betty M. Dean School of NursingA.W. Tozer Seminary, the School of Education, and the School of Graduate Professional Studies. For information about the university, or to arrange a campus visit, call 1-888-9-SIMPSON or visit simpsonu.edu.

Simpson University Hosts 150 Students for Upward Bound Summer Program

REDDING, Calif.—Simpson University hosted approximately 150 North State high school students in mid-June as part of the federally funded Upward Bound program overseen by the university in partnership with College OPTIONS Inc. and the University of California, Davis.

The students, from West Valley, Anderson Union, Dunsmuir and Mount Shasta high schools stayed in residence halls and ate in the dining center. Each day they chose from presentations geared to increase their awareness and knowledge of how higher education benefits various career fields.

More than 20 presenters led sessions, including Redding City Manager Barry Tippin, local real estate professionals, police officers, firefighters, and more. Simpson University biology professor Brian Hooker, history professor Tim Orr, and development director Roger Janis were also among the presenters.

The summer program at Simpson University is designed to give the students a taste of college life, said David Radford, Upward Bound project director for Siskiyou County.

“Living in the dorms is huge,” he said. “It’s definitely a cultural experience. Being on Simpson’s campus gives them college experience and readiness.”

UB-summerStudents in the program are also enrolled in an online college course and had two hours each afternoon to work on that, Radford said. “They could have 12 units of college coursework done by the time they graduate high school,” he said.

Following their week at Simpson, which also included a rafting trip and visit to Whiskeytown Lake, the students spend three weeks working at their high schools with their Upward Bound advisors on their online classes, as well as focusing on other subjects.

During the program’s fifth week, the students travel to the San Francisco Bay Area to visit college campuses. Simpson University is the only campus where students stay overnight, Radford said.

Simpson University was awarded a $5 million federal grant last year to help administer the Upward Bound program for five years to boost higher education success rates among Northern California students.

The national Upward Bound program helps high school students from low-income families and families where neither parent has earned a college degree prepare for college entrance.

Top photo by Stacey Garrett / UC Davis Upward Bound Advisor Daniel Collins leads an expert panel about college and career awareness, financial aid, and concerns related to postsecondary education during Upward Bound’s summer program at Simpson University.

Photo, middle: Kimberly Rubio, an Upward Bound participant from Mount Shasta High School, talks to KRCR-TV reporter Sade Browne about her experience staying on campus.

Related links:
KRCR-TV story

 

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Simpson University, established in 1921, is a Christian university offering undergraduategraduate, and teaching credential programs. The university celebrated its 25th year in Redding and the completion of a Science and Nursing Center in 2014. Academic programs include ASPIRE, a degree-completion program geared toward working adults with both on-campus and online course offerings; the Betty M. Dean School of NursingA.W. Tozer Seminary, the School of Education, and the School of Graduate Professional Studies. For information about the university, or to arrange a campus visit, call 1-888-9-SIMPSON or visit simpsonu.edu.

Red Bluff Woman Juggles Jobs While Earning Simpson University Degree

REDDING, Calif.—After months of balancing two jobs while attending school, Judith Jimenez successfully graduated from Simpson University’s School of Adult and Graduate Professional Studies with a bachelor’s degree in psychology.

Jimenez, a 26-year-old Red Bluff resident, was one of about 150 students to graduate from Simpson University in Redding on April 28.

GRAD_JimenezBefore starting middle school, Jimenez wanted to become a teacher. She kept this dream alive while attending Red Bluff High School and eventually decided to enlist in classes at Shasta College. During her time at Shasta, Jimenez earned her associate’s degree in humanities with a certification for early childhood education.

“The first time I have ever heard of Simpson University and ASPIRE was when I was a Shasta College student and I saw the table that said ‘Simpson University’ out on the quad area,” she said.

Hesitant at first, Jimenez decided to pursue her bachelor’s and fill out an application for ASPIRE in the spring of 2015.

Although she successfully finished the ASPIRE program, it did not come without its challenges.

“I was working at Subway and Burger King,” she said. “I worked part time in both jobs, but it felt like I was working full time.”

Jimenez enjoyed Simpson’s ASPIRE program because it offered classes in the evening. “It gave me the chance to work during the mornings and get things done before I needed to head to class,” she said.

Jimenez said she would recommend the ASPIRE program to others. “Students can complete their degree in 12 to 16 months instead of two years in another school,” she said.

Having her degree will change her life, she said. “It will open the doors to new opportunities and new job environments.”

Jimenez visited her family in Mexico after graduation to celebrate, and said she hopes to work in either foster care or social services.

Learn more about Simpson University’s ASPIRE program at simpsonu.edu/aspire.

Photos by Sarah Barrows

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Simpson University, established in 1921, is a Christian university offering undergraduategraduate, and teaching credential programs. The university celebrated its 25th year in Redding and the completion of a Science and Nursing Center in 2014. Academic programs include ASPIRE, a degree-completion program geared toward working adults with both on-campus and online course offerings; the Betty M. Dean School of NursingA.W. Tozer Seminary, the School of Education, and the School of Graduate Professional Studies. For information about the university, or to arrange a campus visit, call 1-888-9-SIMPSON or visit simpsonu.edu.