Simpson University a ‘Family Practice’ for Dinius Four

REDDING, Calif.—When Simpson University freshman Philip Dinius steps on campus in the fall, he’ll be treading some familiar ground. All three of his older brothers have graduated from or are attending Simpson.

Dinius award

Philip Dinius, left, receives the President’s Academic Scholarship from Simpson University admissions counselor Austin McFadden.

Philip, a 2018 graduate and valedictorian of Redding Christian School, was recently awarded Simpson University’s President’s Academic Scholarship for $12,000. Accepted at four colleges, he chose Simpson because “it’s a Christian university in my hometown, with a small-school feel.”

A talented athlete who played soccer, football, basketball and golf in high school, Philip has signed a letter of intent to play soccer for the Simpson Red Hawks. He plans to major in biology.

He’ll be in good company. Brother Adam Dinius just completed his second year as a Simpson biology major and his first year as a Red Hawk soccer player.

“Mike and I are very much looking forward to watching our two sons play together on Simpson’s men’s soccer team in the next few years,” mom Julie Dinius said. “We have great memories from watching older sons Jon and David play together a few years ago.”

Mike and Julie Dinius moved to Redding from Los Angeles in 1989, shortly after getting married.

“We knew no one when we moved here,” Julie said. “We vowed to give it five years before deciding whether to stay in the North State or not. It’s been a blessing for us here since day 1 – we’ve never looked back or had a desire to move elsewhere.”

Mike bought a small dental practice on Hartnell Avenue in 1989 “and we are now blessed with a large family dental practice of amazing patients,” Julie said.

And “family practice” is right. Oldest son Jon graduated from Simpson in 2015, also as a biology major and soccer player. He will graduate from dental school at the University of Louisville (Ky.) in May 2019 and plans to return home to practice with his father. Jon married fellow Simpson alum Janelle Gaddy.

Both Adam and Philip also plan to go to medical or dental school after graduation from Simpson.

Second son David graduated from Simpson in 2017 with a degree in business administration. He spent a year on the basketball team and two years playing soccer with Jon. He married his Redding Christian high school sweetheart, Sarah Rogers, and moved to Phoenix, where David began an MBA program. They have moved back to Redding, where David is in the Edward Jones training program, and Sarah will student teach this fall.

Simpson University has provided a top-notch educational option for their sons without having to leave the North State, Julie said.

“One of the blessings of living in Redding is that we have a strong Christian university in our own ‘backyard,’” she said.

Photo, top, from left: David and Sarah Dinius, Julie Dinius, Philip Dinius, Adam Dinius, Jon and Janelle (Gaddy) Dinius, and Mike Dinius.

###

Simpson University, established in 1921, is a Christian university offering undergraduategraduate, and teaching credential programs. The university celebrated its 25th year in Redding and the completion of a Science and Nursing Center in 2014. Academic programs include ASPIRE, a degree-completion program geared toward working adults with both on-campus and online course offerings, including degrees in psychology and organizational leadership. For information about the university, or to arrange a campus visit, call 1-888-9-SIMPSON or visit simpsonu.edu.

Simpson University Psychology Students Present at Conference

REDDING, Calif.—Two Simpson University psychology students were selected to present original research this spring at the Western Psychological Association’s annual conference in Portland, Ore.

Junior Joseph VanDyke and senior Hannah Wallace presented research titled, “The Exploration of Anti-Fat Bias and Intuitive Eating Behaviors Among Healthcare Professionals” at the April 26-29 conference.

“Hannah and Joseph are brilliant students who designed, conducted, and wrote their original research from soup to nuts,” said Dr. Ashley Brimager, assistant professor of psychology. “They are the kind of students I would be excited to call colleagues in the near future.”

Both VanDyke and Wallace plan to continue their psychology studies in graduate school. Wallace, from Phelan, Calif., graduated from Simpson University in April and hopes to get accepted into a master’s of social work program. She is gaining internship experience at Bridges to Success in Redding, which provides evidence-based mental health support to children who experience behaviors that disrupt their learning abilities.

“The professors at Simpson have been an essential part of helping me figure out my future plans,” Wallace said. “The opportunity to do research at the bachelor’s level has been a great experience that will help me in graduate school and future employment.”

During the conference, Wallace and VanDyke displayed their research on a poster and took turns answering questions and sharing information with interested colleagues.

The pair looked at the relationship between intuitive eating behaviors (eating by “listening” to one’s body and needs) and anti-fat bias (the level of bias against obese and overweight people) among healthcare professionals.

“Our research suggests that there is a high level of discrimination against overweight people in the healthcare field,” Wallace said. “It also calls for an honest inspection of the eating habits of healthcare workers. Even though our subjects claimed to eat more intuitively, they were still found to eat more based on emotional rather than physical cues.”

Simpson University’s small class sizes allow for close interaction between professors and students, and student research is encouraged and highlighted.

More than 400 people attended the university’s 8th annual Student Research Symposium on campus this spring, which featured 27 student presenters sharing on a variety of topics.

Wallace and VanDyke are among five Simpson students whose research was selected this year for conferences at a regional or national level. Three biology students were selected to present research related to Shasta County’s Iron Mountain Mine at the National Council on Undergraduate Research’s annual conference in Oklahoma.

“The connections that I have made through my professors are a priceless asset of my Simpson University education,” Wallace said.

Simpson University offers psychology programs in its School of Traditional Undergraduate Studies and its School of Adult Studies ASPIRE program. It also offers a Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology.

Photo: Simpson University psychology students Joseph VanDyke and Hannah Wallace presented original research at the Western Psychological Association’s annual conference in Portland, Ore., in April 2018.

###

Other student research stories:
04.12.2018 – Biology Students Present Research at National Council
04.27.2017 – History Student Wins First Place at Regional Conference
04.11.2014 – Simpson University Graduating Seniors to Present Research
01.16.2014 – Simpson University Graduate to Present Research at National Council

Simpson University, established in 1921, is a Christian university offering undergraduategraduate, and teaching credential programs. The university celebrated its 25th year in Redding and the completion of a Science and Nursing Center in 2014. Academic programs include ASPIRE, a degree-completion program geared toward working adults with both on-campus and online course offerings, including degrees in psychology and organizational leadership. For information about the university, or to arrange a campus visit, call 1-888-9-SIMPSON or visit simpsonu.edu.

Redding Foster Mother, Businesswoman Earns Simpson University Degree

“I accomplished more than I ever thought I could.”

REDDING, Calif.—Kristi Hokema, a foster mother to just over 200 children, recently added college graduate to her accomplishments, motivated by words she’d often used to inspire her own family.

GRAD_HokemaHokema, 52, of Redding, was one of 150 students who graduated from Simpson University on April 28. She earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology through Simpson University’s School of Adult and Graduate Professional Studies.

Hokema initially began her college education in the fall of 1984 at Bob Jones University as an education major. After three semesters, Hokema moved back to California and married her husband, Frank, and continued taking classes at Shasta College.

Time passed, and as the couple began to have kids, Hokema decided to stop her education. At age 50, while helping run the family’s business—Hokema’s Sewing and Vacuum—and now taking in foster children, an event stirred her mind to think of the education field once again.

“As I sat through my children’s college graduations, I realized the importance of getting an education that I had instilled into each of them was now looking at me,” she said. “What seemed like a crazy idea became a reality when I started looking into Simpson University’s ASPIRE program.”

With a simple click and a quick prayer, Hokema applied to finish a degree in psychology.

“I chose to pursue a degree in psychology, thinking this was going to be the best way for me to become a better foster parent,” she said.

Hokema is a foster parent with Shasta County Health and Human Services. She has taken in more than over 200 children during the past 13 years.

“When I was a little girl, I always played orphanage with my dolls,” she said. “I knew God was calling me to take in foster children just like He calls missionaries into other countries.”

Because of Hokema’s dedication to continue being a foster parent, she not only worked a full-time job during her time in ASPIRE, but fostered three newborns as well. This came with its challenges, but Hokema pushed through.

“It was tough, but I did it,” she said, noting that during her ASPIRE studies, her family also celebrated a daughter’s wedding and mourned a father-in-law’s death. “I love my classmates that have become like family to me. I loved my instructors that cheered me on and advised me. I accomplished more than I ever thought I could.”

Hokema said she recommends the ASPIRE program to others “with busy lives and unfulfilled goals. If I can do it, so can they,” she said.

Inspired by her progress, she plans to pursue a master’s degree in education and teaching credential through Simpson University’s School of Education.

Simpson University’s School of Adult Studies ASPIRE program offers degrees in business management, organizational leadership, psychology, and liberal studies. Learn more at simpsonu.edu/aspire.

Photos by Sarah Barrows / Top: Kristi Hokema, third from right, prepares to enter the James M. Grant Student Life Center with fellow ASPIRE graduates during Simpson University’s commencement April 28, 2018.

###

Simpson University, established in 1921, is a Christian university offering undergraduategraduate, and teaching credential programs. The university celebrated its 25th year in Redding and the completion of a Science and Nursing Center in 2014. Academic programs include ASPIRE, a degree-completion program geared toward working adults with both on-campus and online course offerings; the Betty M. Dean School of NursingA.W. Tozer Seminary, the School of Education, and the School of Graduate Professional Studies. For information about the university, or to arrange a campus visit, call 1-888-9-SIMPSON or visit simpsonu.edu.

Simpson University’s Hometown Named 10th Most Affordable College City in U.S.

Photo: The Sundial Bridge in Redding stretches over the Sacramento River, which flows through the center of town.

REDDING, Calif.—Simpson University’s hometown of Redding was the only California city listed in a recent survey identifying the nation’s most affordable cities for college students, ranked at No. 10.

“This city offers surprisingly affordable housing, considering California is one of the most expensive spots in the country,” says the report released by Student Loan Hero using cost-of-living data from Numbeo. The data showed single-bedroom apartments in Redding rent for an average of $745 per month.

“Simpson University students also pay significantly less for room and board than students at other private colleges,” Student Loan Hero’s report said. “The college’s cost beats the $12,210 annual average for private colleges by about $3,500.”

rainbow_JenniferFox_crop

A rainbow stretches over Simpson University residence halls.

CNBC ran a story about the survey this week, listing the top 10 “cheapest college towns.”

It said this about Redding: “Although California is home to some of the most expensive places to live in the country, students at Simpson University are getting a deal.
“Undergrads in this Northern California city pay $8,274 for room and board per academic year—much less than students have to shell out at other private schools. With many national parks nearby, there’s also plenty to do outside the classroom that costs nothing at all.”

Peter Martinez, Simpson University’s director of admissions, said the national ranking gives university recruiters an additional resource to share with prospective students and their families.

“It has the potential to bolster our marketing, and for the community of Redding to benefit as well,” he said. “When a student comes to Simpson, they become part of Redding.”

Taking full advantage of the Redding area’s recreational offerings, Simpson University launched an Outdoor Leadership major in fall 2007. Students in the program regularly visit the state and national wilderness areas and parks within an hour’s drive from campus.

immersion-001

Simpson University Outdoor Leadership students have easy access to lakes, trails, mountains and more, thanks to Redding’s location in the heart of the Shasta Recreation Area.

Learn more about Simpson University, and talk to an admissions counselor about the affordability of a quality Christian higher education in Redding’s scenic location, at simpsonu.edu/admissions.

Learn more about the city of Redding at https://www.visitredding.com/ and https://www.cityofredding.org/.

###

Simpson University, established in 1921, is a Christian university offering undergraduategraduate, and teaching credential programs. The university celebrated its 25th year in Redding and the completion of a Science and Nursing Center in 2014. Academic programs include ASPIRE, a degree-completion program geared toward working adults with both on-campus and online course offerings; the Betty M. Dean School of NursingA.W. Tozer Seminary, the School of Education, and the School of Graduate Professional Studies. For information about the university, or to arrange a campus visit, call 1-888-9-SIMPSON or visit simpsonu.edu.

Over 1,000 Students Visit Simpson University for KinderCollege Day 

REDDING, Calif. – More than 1,000 Shasta County kindergarten students visited the Simpson University campus on Friday, May 11, as part of the annual KinderCollege Day event organized by College OPTIONS.

The goal of KinderCollege Day is to introduce students to the idea of post-high school education and career possibilities early in their academic careers, and to let parents and teachers know it is never too early to discuss those possibilities with children.

Simpson University President Robin Dummer, who retires from the university this month, gave a brief welcome to the children, teachers and parents in attendance.

Throughout the morning, kindergarten classes rotated through interactive career stations from a variety of organizations and programs, including Dignity Health, the Institute of Technology, Haven Humane, Redding Electric Utility, the Redding Fire Department, Redding Bank of Commerce, and the California Highway Patrol.

“Shasta County KinderCollege Day is an interactive day filled with engaging presenters that are there to help kindergartners learn more about their profession, and the education needed for their career,” said Lianne Richelieu of College OPTIONS.

In addition to College OPTIONS and Simpson University, the event was sponsored by First 5 Shasta, Institute of Technology, Reach Higher Shasta, Redding Bank of Commerce, ScholarShare 529, The McConnell Foundation, Snow Mountain Natural Spring Water, and many local businesses.

For more information on KinderCollege Day or other College OPTIONS events, visit www.collegeoptions.org.

-Source: College OPTIONS press release

# # #

Providing school- and community-based college awareness and preparation services, College OPTIONS is making a difference in the lives of Shasta, Siskiyou, Tehama, Trinity and Modoc county students and their families. Visit www.collegeoptions.org for more information.

…..

Simpson University, established in 1921, is a Christian university offering undergraduategraduate, and teaching credential programs. The university celebrated its 25th year in Redding and the completion of a Science and Nursing Center in 2014. Academic programs include ASPIRE, a degree-completion program geared toward working adults with both on-campus and online course offerings; the Betty M. Dean School of NursingA.W. Tozer Seminary, the School of Education, and the School of Graduate Professional Studies. For information about the university, or to arrange a campus visit, call 1-888-9-SIMPSON or visit simpsonu.edu.

Simpson University Graduates Nine Women in Biology

REDDING, Calif.—Simpson University’s graduating class of 2018 includes nine biology students, whose future interests range from pharmacy school to clinical laboratory scientist to infectious disease research and more.

The fact that all nine are women – in a field sometimes dominated by men – doesn’t strike them as particularly notable.

“We are in the 21st century, and I’m grateful for it,” said Julianna Gilson, 22, of San Juan Capistrano.

“It’s honestly something I never thought about before, but I think that everyone in our class will be going on to do great things in their careers,” said Molly Smith, 28, of Redding, who plans to apply to a clinical laboratory scientist program.

Classmate Katie Weber, 23, of Redding, noted, “(We) had the privilege of growing up in a culture where women have access to and are encouraged to pursue higher education.”

Weber plans to work as a natural science educator at Turtle Bay Exploration Park in Redding and continue in the field of science education.

“I think our graduating class sets an example,” she said. “I hope that we not only encourage more women to consider careers in science, but we also inspire young girls to discover more about the world around them, asking questions and staying curious.”

Curiosity, a love of learning, and a desire to understand how things work were common reasons why these students picked biology as their field of study.

BIOSenior Banquet 2018

Class of 2018 Simpson University biology graduates, standing, from left: Jessica Dager, Fallon Greenhaw, Stevielee Jansen, Molly Smith, Rachel Last, Rebecca Chapman; seated, from left: Corinne Schali, Kaitlyn Weber, Julianna Gilson.

“I was the kid that would ask ‘Why?’ to everything,” said Rebecca Chapman, 21, of Burney. “Biology has not only answered many of my questions, but it has also opened my eyes to see just how crazy the world is.”

Chapman participated in the Biology Club at Simpson for four years, including serving as treasurer and secretary.

“I chose biology because of my fascination with the unseen world and how things work together to cause life,” said Jessica Dager, 22, of Shingle Springs, Calif. “It has taught me discipline and humbleness.”

Dager balanced the demands of the biology major with a traveling schedule as a member of the Red Hawks softball team, which won the NCCAA championship her freshman year. She also helped lead the university’s First Year Experience program for a year.

Rachel Last, 21, of Grass Valley, said studying science expands her theology. “Learning more about science also shows me how big God is,” she said. “I learn more about the Creator by studying his creation.”

Last and two of her classmates, Gilson and Corinne Schali of Cottonwood, were selected to present biology research this spring at the National Council on Undergraduate Research’s annual conference in Oklahoma. The trio worked on identifying microorganisms that thrive in the acid drainage of Shasta County’s Iron Mountain Mine and also presented methods Simpson biology students are using to stimulate those organisms to neutralize the acid, to clean up the mine.

Biology-Students-Gilson-LastThat research experience will be valuable to both Last and Gilson (pictured left in an interview with KRCR-TV), who plan to pursue graduate studies and research in immunotherapy or epidemiology and infectious diseases. Schali plans to go to graduate school to become a physician’s assistant.

“My professors have gone above and beyond to meet with me when I have questions and have also become mentors and resources for my graduate school pursuit,” Last said.

Her classmates echoed her sentiments about the support they received from their professors, as well as the advantages of Simpson’s class sizes.

“The smaller class sizes allowed a sense of community among the students and professors, which made it a much better learning experience,” Smith said.

“Simpson’s biology program is unique because of the relationships the faculty intentionally build with their students,” Gilson said. “The faculty here are deeply invested in the lives and education of students.”

Learn more about Simpson’s biology program at simpsonu.edu/biology.

###

Related media:
KRCR-TV story about the Class of 2018 biology graduates
Redding Record Searchlight graduation photo gallery 

Simpson University, established in 1921, is a Christian university offering undergraduategraduate, and teaching credential programs. The university celebrated its 25th year in Redding and the completion of a Science and Nursing Center in 2014. Academic programs include ASPIRE, a degree-completion program geared toward working adults with both on-campus and online course offerings; the Betty M. Dean School of NursingA.W. Tozer Seminary, the School of Education, and the School of Graduate Professional Studies. For information about the university, or to arrange a campus visit, call 1-888-9-SIMPSON or visit simpsonu.edu.

Simpson University Board of Trustees Announces New President

REDDING, Calif. – The Simpson University Board of Trustees is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Norman Hall as 15th president of Simpson University.

Dr. Hall is the Vice President for International and Alumni Affairs & Major Gift Officer at Greenville University in Greenville, Ill. Previously, he served as Vice President and Dean of Student Development at Greenville University and Director of Residence Life at Azusa Pacific University and at Ashland University in Ashland, Ohio.

Dr. Hall, 53, received his doctorate in educational administration from Pepperdine University, a master of science in education from Southern Illinois University, and bachelor’s degrees in biology and sociology from Greenville University.

Dr. Hall replaces President Robin Dummer, who served as interim president for two years before becoming president in 2015. Dr. Dummer announced last year his plans to retire from Simpson after the 2017-18 year.

A presidential search committee was formed last August, composed of Simpson University faculty, staff, administration, alumni, student and board representatives. The search was aided by the consulting firm JobFitMatters.

Dr. Hall was the unanimous recommendation of the executive committee to the full board, which voted unanimously April 30 to appoint him president. His first day in that role will be June 1.

“We are really pleased to introduce Dr. Hall to the Simpson and Redding communities,” board Chair Norm Reinhardt said. “We find that he brings gifts and personal qualities uniquely suited to Simpson’s vision and needs at this juncture in our rich history.”

Dr. Hall and his wife, Alison, have three college-age children.

“I am excited to be joining Simpson University, and we look forward to becoming part of the Redding community,” Dr. Hall said. “My motivation to provide excellence in Christian higher education springs from a deeply rooted commitment to growing students who will impact the world for Christ.”

Video of a press conference held May 1. Simpson University Board of Trustees chair Norm Reinhardt introduces Dr. Norman Hall, the board’s unanimous selection for 15th president of the university.

Top photo by Sarah Barrows 

Related media links:
Redding Record Searchlight article
Redding Record Searchlight video interview with Dr. Hall

###

Simpson University, established in 1921, is a Christian university offering undergraduate, graduate, and teaching credential programs. The university celebrated its 25th year in Redding and the completion of a Science and Nursing Center in 2014. Academic programs include ASPIRE, a degree-completion program geared toward working adults with both on-campus and online course offerings; the Betty M. Dean School of Nursing, A.W. Tozer Seminary, the School of Education, and the School of Graduate Professional Studies. For information about the university, or to arrange a campus visit, call 1-888-9-SIMPSON or visit simpsonu.edu.